The Body Legal in Barbarian Law

The sixth to ninth centuries saw a flowering of written laws among the early Germanic tribes. These laws include tables of fines for personal injury, designed to offer a legal, non-violent alternative to blood feud. Using these personal injury tariffs, Lisi Oliver examines a variety of issues, including the interrelationships between victims, perpetrators, and their families; the causes and results of wounds inflicted in daily life; the methods, successes, and failures of healing techniques; the processes of individual redress or public litigation; and the native and borrowed developments in the various ‘barbarian’ territories as they separated from the Roman Empire.

This book is part of CMS’s Toronto Anglo-Saxon Series, and is available from University of Toronto Press.