Siân Echard, “How Gower Found his Vox: Latin and the Gowerian Poetic”

2015-16 J. R. O’DONNELL MEMORIAL LECTURE IN MEDIEVAL STUDIES

Professor Siân Echard

Department of English, University of British Columbia

“How Gower Found his Vox: Latin and the Gowerian Poetic”

Echard--southwark cathedral gower%27s tomb books

Friday, 29 January 2016

4:10 p.m.

Great Hall, Room 310
Centre for Medieval Studies
125 Queen’s Park
Toronto, Ontario

Reception to follow

 

This lecture series is free and open to the public.

If you have an accessibility or accommodation need for this event, please contact the Centre for Medieval Studies: email hidden; JavaScript is required or (416) 978-4884.

Jointly sponsored by: The Centre for Medieval Studies, Centre for Comparative Literature, Department of Classics, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, and the Journal of Medieval Latin.

 

Printable flyer available here.

Congratulations to Dr Helen Marshall!

Dr. Helen Marshall has recently been appointed as Lecturer of Creative Writing and Publishing for the Department of English and Media at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, England. There she will join with Dr. Tiffani Angus and Dr. Laura Dietz to form the new Publishing Team, responsible for delivering the department’s Master of Arts in Publishing. Her experience as a book historian and her research into English manuscript production in the fourteenth century will very much inform her teaching in this role.

GIftsFortheOne_FINAL_0

Dr. Marshall is also an active creative writer, and the author of two award-winning collections of short stories: Hair Side, Flesh Side (2012) and Gifts for the One Who Comes After (2014). The majority of the writing of these two books was completed alongside her PhD. Both respond in different ways to her experience of working in the archives, and they explore the themes of art and its relationship to issues of history, memory, and personal legacy.

http://www.helen-marshall.com

W. John Bennett Distinguished Visiting Scholar, 2015-16

A warm welcome to Professor Felix Heinzer who is spending the spring term with us as the W. John Bennett Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Medieval Studies and the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

Felix Heinzer

Felix Heinzer

Professor Heinzer is an expert in codicology, liturgy and liturgical poetry, and the history of monastic libraries (especially those in south-west Germany). His first studies were in Philosophy and Catholic Theology at the Universities of Rome (Gregoriana), Lyon, Chur, Fribourg (Switzerland) and Bonn, and he received his doctoral degree at Fribourg with a thesis on the Christology of Maximus Confessor. After six years as a cataloguer of medieval manuscripts at Karlsruhe (Badische Landesbibliothek), in 1986 he became the Head of the Manuscripts Department at Stuttgart Wurttemberg State Library. In 2005, following his Habilitation at the University of Basel on monastic book culture and ideas of monastic reform in medieval south-west Germany (2001), Felix Heinzer was appointed Professor of Medieval Latin at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität University of Freiburg (Germany). He has also served as the Wolfgang-Stammler-Gastprofessor für Germanische Philologie at the University of Fribourg/ Schweiz (2002-03) and as internal senior fellow at the Freiburg Research Institute for Advanced Studies (2012).

 Professor Heinzer has been a member of the Unterausschuss für Handschriftenkatalogisierung der Deutschen  Forschungsgemeinschaft (1990-2000) and of the committee of the Mediävistischer Arbeitskreis der Herzog-August-Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel (2003-2013), and is currently part of the Kommission für Deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters der Phil.-hist. Klasse der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften München (since 2005) and of the Wissenschaftlicher Beirat of the project “Corpus monodicum. Die einstimmige Musik des lateinischen Mittelalters” (since 2012).

 Felix Heinzer will give a public lecture on 18 March 2016, entitled “’Many things newly composed for the Church’: Walahfrid Strabo († 849) and Notker Balbulus († 912) between Biblical Tradition and Poetical Innovation.”

Piroska Nagy, “A History of Emotions in the Medieval West”

Professor PIROSKA NAGY (Université du Québec à Montréal)

will give a lecture on the History of Emotions in the Medieval West

Thursday, 11 February 2016, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Centre for Medieval Studies, Room 310

3rd Floor, Lillian Massey Building, 125 Queen’s Park

Capture d’écran 2015-12-16 à 7.58.25 AM

This talk is sponsored by the History Department and CMS.

For more information on Prof. Nagy, please consult her CV on the website of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales