Prestigious TATP Teaching Excellence Award: one CMS PhD student short-listed

Every year, the Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation offers awards to the best Teaching Assistants on campus. Only twelve TAs make it to the short-list among hundreds nominated. Of these twelve short-listed in 2017, one was a PhD student from the Centre for Medieval Studies: Lochin Brouillard. CONGRATULATIONS!

Lochin 1Here are some extracts of the letter written for Lochin by the professor who nominated her. “Lochin has been my T.A. in the VIC 343Y ‘Sex and Gender in the Renaissance’ for the past three years and has gained my absolute trust and admiration for the great work she has done in the course. […] One reason for Lochin’s great success as a TA is her profound dedication to teaching and to helping students do their best. She mentors students on a one-to-one basis, learns their name, draws them into the discussion, and makes them feel at home and valued. Another reason is Lochin’s own character – open, friendly, relaxed, supportive. She epitomizes the best of what a teacher should be. She always has a smile on her lips and great ideas in her mind – she engages with students and contributes to class discussions with ease and elegance, and also with profound knowledge of the materials and the field. And she manages to steer a clear, scholarly course without infringing on anyone’s sensibilities (not an easy task on a course on ‘sex and gender’).”

The Teaching Assistants’ Training Program’s (TATP) Teaching Excellence Award was created in 2003 to recognize the outstanding contributions of teaching assistants across all four divisions in the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto. The award seeks to value the work of TAs who regularly inspire and challenge undergraduate students. It means that the individuals who won this award and the ones who were short-listed for it can count themselves among the University’s top TAs!

CMS does not have an undergraduate component to its program. Therefore our PhD students are sometimes frustrated as they cannot TA as much as they would like. The fact that one of the twelve TAs short-listed by TATP this year, two from last year (Amanda Wetmore who won the award and Nicholas Wheeler), and already one in 2015 (Michael Fatigati) were from CMS is the perfect proof that any institution hiring CMS students gets the service of extremely talented and incredibly knowledgeable TAs.

Good tidings from our alumni and alumnae

Congratulations to Tom Klein (Ph.D. 1998) who has had the pleasure to serve as the Director of English Undergraduate Studies, Idaho State University, since January 2016.  Tom has been working at Idaho State University since 2000, where he regularly teaches Old English and medieval literature courses, and directs medieval thesis and dissertation projects.

 

Congratulations to Edward Macierowski (Ph.D. 1979), professor of philosophy at Benedictine College, for one of his latest publications, “Which Sciences Does Political Science Direct and Use and How Does It Do So?” The St. John’s Review, Volume 57, Number 2 (Spring 2016): 70-78. This article illustrates the doctrinal importance of Bywater’s suppression of a manuscript reading in his Oxford edition of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. You can learn more about Prof. Macierowski’s most recent research projects here.

 

Congratulations to Lisa Chen Obrist (Ph.D. 2015), who has been appointed as a Senior Evaluation Officer at the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI).  Her responsibilities include research and analysis related to CFI funding mechanisms, policies, and funded infrastructure as well as providing leadership, support, and project management on matters relating to outcome assessment, corporate performance measurement, data management, and science-technology-innovation policy analysis.

 

Congratulations to Russell Poole (Ph.D. 1975), who continues to serve as editor of Viking and Medieval Scandinavia and Manawatu Journal of History, devoted to the Manawatu region of Dr. Poole’s native New Zealand. In the last two years, he published the collective volume Egil, the Viking Poet. New approaches to Egil’s Saga (Toronto: University of Toronto Press) as well as two essays, “Identity Poetics among the Icelandic Skalds” in New Norse Studies. Essays on the Literature and Culture of Medieval Scandinavia, ed. J. Turco (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 143-84), and also “Pleasure in the gold cup: a skaldic affirmation?” in Frederic Amory in Memoriam: Old Norse-Icelandic Studies, ed. by J. Lindow and G. Clark (Berkeley: Wildcat Canyon Advanced Seminars, pp. 44-68).

Congratulations to Kathryn Salzer, Mary Dzon, and Catherine Conybeare for their new books!

The Centre for Medieval Studies wishes to extend its congratulations to three alumnae who recently published important monographs.

Catherine Conybeare (Ph.D. 1997), Professor and Chair of the Department of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies at Bryn Mawr College, published The Routledge Guidebook to Augustine’s Confessions (London: Routledge, 2016).

Mary Dzon (Ph.D. 2004), Associate Professor of English at the University of Knoxville-Tennessee, published The Quest for the Christ Child in the Later Middle Ages (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017).

Kathryn Salzer (Ph.D. 2009) published Vaucelles Abbey: Social, Political, and Ecclesiastical Relationships in the Borderland Region of the Cambrésis, 1131-1300 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2017). In addition, Kathryn has received tenure this very month, making her Associate Professor of History at Pennsylvania State University.

Canadian Society of Medievalists in Toronto — 25-27 May 2017

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CSMThe Canadian Society of Medievalists will be holding its annual meeting at Ryerson University, from Saturday, 27 May to Monday, 29 May 2017.

The plenary address will be delivered by the Centre’s Director, Suzanne Conklin Akbari on Saturday, 27 May, 4:30-5:30 PM.

A number of members of the CMS community, including faculty, students, and alumni, will be presenting at the conference:

Lochin Brouillard (University of Toronto), “Paterfamilias, Son, and Servant: Rethinking the History of Service and the Family in the Medieval Monastery”.

Isabelle Cochelin (University of Toronto), “Lay Monastic Servants versus Lay Domestic Servants”.

Eduardo Fabbro (Saint Jerome University), “Deo iudicante: God and Warfare in Carolingian Thought”.

Jessica Henderson and Laura Mitchell (University of Toronto), “A Virtual Library: Reconstructing John Stow’s Medieval Manuscripts”.

Rachel Koopmans (York University), “Physicians Pictured in the Early Gothic Stained Glass of Canterbury Cathedral”.

Patrick McBrine (Independent Scholar), “Biblical Epics in Late Antiquity and Anglo-Saxon England”.

Heather Pigat (Art Museum University of Toronto), “Economical Luxury: New Considerations of Purple Manuscripts”.

Richard Shaw (Our Lady Seat of Wisdom, Ontario), “The composition of Bede’s Historia ecclesiastica”.

The full programme of the conference may be consulted here.

Congratulations to Andrew Hicks for his new book!

Hicks, Andrew. Composing the World: Harmony in the Medieval Platonic Cosmos. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017).

 

“We can hear the universe!” This was the triumphant proclamation at a February 2016 press conference announcing that the Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) had detected a “transient gravitational-wave signal.” Taking in hand this current “discovery” that we can listen to the cosmos, Andrew Hicks argues that sound—and the harmonious coordination of sounds, sources, and listeners—has always been an integral part of the history of studying the cosmos. Composing the World charts one constellation of musical metaphors, analogies, and expressive modalities embedded within a late-ancient and medieval cosmological discourse: that of a cosmos animated and choreographed according to a specifically musical aesthetic. The specific historical terrain of Hicks’ discussion centers upon the world of twelfth-century philosophy, and from there he offers a new intellectual history of the role of harmony in medieval cosmological discourse, a discourse which itself focused on the reception and development of Platonism. 

With a rare convergence of musicological, philosophical, and philological rigor, Hicks presents a narrative tour through medieval cosmology with reflections on important philosophical movements along the way, raising connections to Cartesian dualism, Uexküll’s theoretical biology, and Deleuze and Guattari’s musically inspired language of milieus and (de)territorialization. Hicks ultimately suggests that the models of musical cosmology popular in late antiquity and the twelfth century are relevant to our modern philosophical and scientific undertakings. Impeccably researched and beautifully written, 
Composing the World will resonate with a variety of readers, and it encourages us to rethink the role of music and sound within our greater understanding of the universe.

composing the world coverIn praise of Composing the World, John Marenbon (Senior Research Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge) writes, “Hicks’ book is required reading, not just for historians of music and cosmology, but for everyone interested in medieval thought,” and Peter Pesic (director of the Science Institute at St. John’s College, Sante Fe, NM and author of Music and the Making of Modern Science) calls it “a scholarly tour de force that will be a valuable resource for all who are interested in the deep history of cosmic harmony.”

 

 

For more details on the book, consult the publisher’s website here.