Workshop on the Letters of Boniface (d. 754) and Lul (d. 785)

Rethinking the “Christian Foundation of Europe”:
An International Workshop on the Letters of Boniface (d. 754) and Lul (d. 785)
Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies and Trinity College, University of Toronto
Toronto, September 22–24, 2011

Thursday, September 22, 2011
Laurence K. Shook Common Room, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
8:45–9:30 Coffee
9:30–10:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks
Richard Alway, Praeses, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
John Magee, Director, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
Alain Stoclet, Organizer
10:00–10:45 Session 1: General Introduction 
Dáibhí Ó Cróinín: The Importance of the Collection.
10:45–11:00 Coffee break
11:00–12:30 Session 2: Introducing BLE
Mary Garrison: The Boniface Letters: Some Comparisons, chiefly with Alcuin, and their Implications.
Jonathan Herold: Collecting and Preserving Written Records in the Age of Boniface.
12:30–2:00 Lunch (Common Room, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies)
2:00–3:00 Roundtable 1 (Moderator: T.B.A.)
Discussion will bear on the preceding papers by Ó Croínin, Garrison and Herold, as well as on broader issues pertaining to the prospective edition, such as the Introduction’s outline and contents or the inclusion in it of a summary of overarching findings, and the composition of editorial team and board of scientific advisors.
3:00–3:15 Coffee break
3:15–5:00 Session 3: Context
Achim Thomas Hack: From Archive to Codex.
James Palmer: Successor and Keeper? Lul and BLE.
Michael Elliot: BLE 50 and the Problem of Missing Names.
5:00–6:30 Reception (Common Room, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies)

Friday, September 23, 2011
Ethics Centre Seminar Room, Trinity College
8:30–9:00 Coffee
9:00–9:45 Session 4: Context (continued)
Andy Orchard: Lul and Boniface as Heirs to an Anglo-Saxon Tradition.
9:45–10:45 Roundtable 2 (Moderator: John Eldevik)
Dicussion will bear on the papers by Hack, Palmer, Elliot and Orchard. If feasible, brief memos and/or bibliographies will be circulated beforehand on: Fulda, Mainz and Reims in the ninth century, which will hopefully nourish the debate on context.
10:45–11:00 Coffee break
11:00–12:30 Session 5: Manuscripts
Alain Stoclet: The Manuscript Tradition, with Special Reference to Monacensis.
Christopher Landon: Tracking Sonderüberlieferungen : Hazards (BLE 92, Lul to Abbot Gregory of Utrecht) and Rewards (BLE 10, the Vision of the Monk of Wenlock).
12:30–2:00 Lunch (Ethics Centre, Trinity College)
2:00–3:00 Roundtable 3 (Moderator: James Carley)
Discussion will bear on the preceding papers, by Stoclet and Landon, as well as on: the typology of manuscripts; the search for new manuscripts; what to do with excerpts of the Letters found in canon law compilations; variations in selection and order of the Letters; creation of a virtual library and digitized facsimiles.
3:00–3:15 Coffee break
3:15–5:00 Session 6: Transmission and Scholarship (Medieval and Modern)
Wilhelm Friesen: In the Beginning: Willibald, BLE and the Vita Bonifatii Prima.
Michael Glatthaar: The Two Versions of Concilium Germanicum.
Heinrich Wagner: A New World? Johannes Nauclerus’ Chronica and the first printed Letters.
5:00–6:30 Reception (Provost’s Lodge, Trinity College)

Saturday, September 24, 2011
Ethics Centre Seminar Room, Trinity College
8:30–8:45 Coffee
8:45–9:45 Roundtable 4 (Moderator: T.B.A.)
Discussion will bear on the preceding papers, by Friesen, Glatthaar and Wagner, as well as on practical issues relating to the catalogue of instances of—indirect or secondary—transmission; preparing preliminary lists of entries; distributing tasks.
9:45–11:15 Session 7: Edition
Rob Meens: Editing the Letters: some thoughts.
Michael Herren: The Style of the Letters of Boniface.
11:15–11:30 Coffee break
11:30–12:30 Roundtable 5 (Moderator: Stephanie Hayes-Healy)
Discussion will bear on the preceding papers, by Meens and Herren, as well as on the edition translation, and commentary on Letter 95, which has been chosen as a test-case.
12:30–2:00 Lunch (Ethics Centre, Trinity College)
2:00–4:00 PLENARY ROUNDTABLE (Moderator: Ann Dooley)
Discussion will bear on the broader challenges of the proposed new edition, translation, and commentary for which the Workshop has prepared the ground.
4:00–4:15 Concluding remarks
Andy Orchard and Alain Stoclet, Organizers

Please note that the Laurence K. Shook Common Room has two dozen seats in addition to those reserved for speakers and round-table moderators and the Ethics Centre Seminar Room half as many: within these limits, anyone interested in attending is welcome.

The organizers gratefully acknowledge major funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada in the form of an Aid to Research Workshops and Conferences grant, as well as additional contributions by the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto (T.B.C.), the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies and Trinity College, University of Toronto.

University of Toronto Colloquium in Medieval Philosophy

Friday, September 23
Session I (4:30–6:30)
Chair:  Scott MacDonald (Cornell University)
Speaker:  Jennifer Ashworth (University of Waterloo):
“Aquinas, Scotus and Others on Naming, Knowing, and the Origin of Language”
Commentator:  Giorgio Pini (Fordham University)

Saturday, September 24
Session II (10:00–12:00)
Chair:  Bob Sweetman (Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto)
Speaker:  Susan Brower-Toland (St. Louis University):
“Medieval Approaches to Consciousness: Ockham and Chatton”
Commentator:  Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Session III (2:00–4:00)
Chair: Matthew Siebert (University of Toronto)
Eric Hagedorn (University of Notre Dame): “Ockham’s Mental Language and the Dispute over the Subject of Scientia
Jennifer Pelletier (Université du Québec à Montréal): “Metaphysics and the Categories in Ockham”
Rachel Bauder (University of Toronto): “Naming Caesar: Siger of Brabant on Proper Names”

Session IV (4:15–6:15)
Chair:  David Piché (Université de Montréal)
Speaker:  Jack Zupko (University of Winnipeg):
“Contextualizing the Self-Knowledge Question in Later Medieval Philosophy”
Commentator:  Neil Lewis (Georgetown University)

All sessions will be held in room 100 of the Jackman Humanities Building (170 St. George Street).

All sessions are free and open to the public. Email us for 
registration and inquiries. Visit the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy for further information.

The colloquium is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Studies, the Centre for Medieval Studies, and the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

Organizers: Deborah Black, Peter King, Martin Pickavé

Welcome to the 2011–2012 Academic Year

The Centre for Medieval Studies welcomes new and old students to a new academic year. The Centre will be participating in various events to kick off the year, beginning with orientation events in the week before classes and continuing with the Toronto Colloquium in Medieval Philosophy and a Workshop on the Letters of Boniface and Lul later in the month. We look forward to another year of new insights into the medieval world and its influence on contemporary society.