Congratulations to Christopher Berard for his recent publication!

Congratulations to alumnus Christopher Berard (PhD 2015) for the publication of Arthurianism in Early Plantagenet England from Henry II to Edward I (Boydell & Brewer, 2019).

9781783273744_29_1_5The precedent of empire and the promise of return lay at the heart of King Arthur’s appeal in the Middle Ages. Both ideas found fullness of expression in the twelfth century: monarchs and magnates sought to recreate an Arthurian golden age that was as wondrous as the biblical and classical worlds, but less remote. Arthurianism, the practice of invoking and emulating the legendary Arthur of post-Roman Britain, was thus an instance of medieval medievalism.
This book provides a comprehensive history of the first 150 years of Arthurianism, from its beginnings under Henry II of England to a highpoint under Edward I. It contends that the Plantagenet kings of England mockingly ascribed a literal understanding of the myth of King Arthur’s return to the Brittonic Celts whilst adopting for themselves a figurative and typological interpretation of the myth. A central figure in this work is Arthur of Brittany (1187-1203), who, for more than a generation, was the focus of Arthurian hopes and their disappointment.

 

For more information, consult the publisher’s website.

Presentation by Christiane Gruber of her New Book, The Praiseworthy One

The Praiseworthy One: Devotional Images of the Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Traditions

by Christiane Gruber, Professor and Associate Chair in the History of Art. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 9.26.25 PMWednesday, March 6th, 2019

5:00-7:00 pm

Centre for Medieval Studies, Room 310

125 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C7

This presentation explores a number of paintings of the Prophet Muhammad produced in Persian and Turkish lands from the fourteenth century to the modern day. Ranging from veristic to abstract, these images represent Muhammad’s individual traits, primordial luminosity, and veiled essence. Their pictorial motifs reveal that artists engaged in abstract thought and turned to symbolic motifs in order to imagine Muhammad, the “praiseworthy” Prophet and Messenger of Islam.  The talk is related to Gruber’s recently published book, The Praiseworthy One: The Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Texts and Images. (Indiana University Press, 2019).

 

Reading and Q&A with author (and alumna) Helen Marshall for the release of her new publication

The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Old Books New Science Lab at the University of Toronto present the launch of Helen Marshall‘s The Migration

The Migration

Please join us for a reception followed by a reading and a Q&A with the Audience.

Friday, March 8th 2019 at 5:30 pmMarshall_Helen© Vince Haig 2018

Lillian Massey Building – Centre for Medieval Studies

Reception in The Great Hall (Room 312), reading in Room 310

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

This Event is Free

2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by Professor Gregory Hays

You are invited to the 2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by:

Professor Gregory Hays

Department of Classics, University of Virginia

“A World Without Letters: Fulgentius and his De aetatibus mundi et hominis

Friday, 1 March 2019

 4:10 p.m.

Room 301

Centre for Medieval Studies

125 Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

Reception to follow

The Implications of Reading Brian Stock Colloquium – 15 March 2019

Please consult the website of the event for additional information.

THE IMPLICATIONS OF READING BRIAN STOCKScreen Shot 2019-02-21 at 2.55.38 PM

The colloquium, organized by Gur Zak and Sarah Powrie, offers an opportunity to consider the legacy and influence of Brian Stock’s scholarship on the history of reading.

REGISTRATION

Conference speakers are automatically registered. Others wishing to register should do so through the Eventbrite website. Registration is free of charge.

DATE AND TIME

Fri, 15 March 2019

8:30 AM – 7:00 PM EDT

LOCATION

Rm 112 of the Victoria College Building

73 Queen’s Park Crescent East

Toronto, ON M5S 2C3

 

SCHEDULE

Room 112 (Alumni Hall) of the Victoria College Building

8:15 Registration and Welcome

8:45 Opening Remarks

OPENING LECTURE, 9:00-9:30

Aviad Kleinberg, Tel Aviv University, “The Life of Brian”

SESSION 1: 9:30-11:00

Seth Lerer, UC San Diego, “The Textualized Augustine and Late Antique Communities”

Paul Saenger, Newberry Library, “Augustine’s Ideas on Vision and the Evolving Format of the Patristic Page”

Sarah Spence, Medieval Academy of America, “Augustine, Vergil and the Geography of Loss”

11:00-11:30 coffee

SESSION 2: 11:30-12:45

John Magee, University of Toronto, “Boethius and the Legacy of Alexander of Aphrodisias”

Marcia Colish, Yale University, “Self-Baptism in the Middle Ages”

Bruce Holsinger, University of Virginia, “Augustine the Eater”

1:00-2:30 Lunch

SESSION 3: 2:30-4:00

Willemien Otten, University of Chicago, “Naturalism without Mediation: William of Conches and Hildegard of Bingen on Thinking Nature”

Suzanne Akbari, University of Toronto ,”Allegory and Integument, from the Victorines to Christine de Pizan”

Elisa Brilli, University of Toronto, “Dante’s Inner Dialogues”

4:00-4:30 coffee

SESSION 4: 4:30-6:00

Albert Ascoli, UC Berkeley, “Believe Me! Stories of Reading in the Early Modern Period”

Jane Tylus, Yale University, “Listening for the congedo: scenes of goodbye in the Renaissance”

Giuseppe Mazzotta, Yale University, “”What is Vico’s New Science About? Vico’s Imaginary Dialogue with St. Augustine”

CONCLUDING LECTURE, 6:00-6:30

Natalie Zemon Davis, University of Toronto, “A Scholarly Friendship”

 

Congratulations to Ann Marie Rasmussen for her new publication!

Rivalrous Masculinities. New Directions in Medieval Gender Studies, edited by Ann Marie Rasmussen. Notre Dame Press.Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 2.17.58 PM

Here is a new edited collection that may interest a broad cross-section of scholars. Bringing together the work of both leading and emerging scholars in the field of medieval gender studies, the essays in Rivalrous Masculinities advance our understanding of medieval masculinity as a pluralized category and as an intersectional category of gender.  In order to ground this intersectional and interdisciplinary approach with the appropriate disciplinary expertise, the essays in this volume represent a broad cross-section of disciplines: art history, religious studies, history, and French, Italian, German, Yiddish, Middle English, and Old English literature. Together, they open up new intellectual vistas for future research in the field of medieval gender studies.

Congratulations to Professors Alexandra Gillespie and Suzanne Akbari for the funding they received from the Mellon Foundation for their project “The Book and the Silk Roads”

In December the University of Toronto was awarded $1.25 million (Canadian dollars) by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the initial phase of a collaboration led by Professor Alex Gillespie and co-principal investigators Professor Suzanne Akbari (Centre for Medieval Studies) and Sian Meikle (University of Toronto Libraries Information Technology Services). Together they are undertaking an international research initiative to investigate the origins and development of book bindings in the project “The Book and the Silk Roads.”

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127(322), detail of the book binding

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127 (322), detail of the book binding (picture taken by Cécile Treffort)

“The picture that will emerge based on this research will be richer and more complex than what we previously knew about the history of the book,” says Gillespie.

For more information, please read “An Open Book.”