The Coming of the Book in Islam, 7th-8th Centuries

Lecture by HOUARI TOUATI, Directeur d’études at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris

Tuesday 27 October, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Sidney Smith Hall Room 2098 (100 St. George Street)

Event Sponsors:

  • Centre for Medieval Studies
  • Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture
  • Department of History
  • Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
  • Institute for Islamic Studies
  • Jackman Humanities Institute

This event is free and open to all.  Registration is not required. For further information, please contact the Department of History at (416) 978-3363 or email hidden; JavaScript is required.

Download flyer: [pdf]

The Calligraphic Albums of Medieval Islam

Lecture by HOUARI TOUATI, Directeur d’études at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris

Thursday 22 October, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Jackman Humanities Building Room 100 (170 St. George Street)

Event Sponsors:

  • Centre for Medieval Studies
  • Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture
  • Department of History
  • Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
  • Institute for Islamic Studies
  • Jackman Humanities Institute

This event is free and open to all.  Registration is not required. For further information, please contact the Department of History at (416) 978-3363 or email hidden; JavaScript is required.

Download flyer: [pdf]

Academic Position Available, Medieval History

Position/Title Rank: Assistant Professor – Tenure Stream (Medieval History)
Faculty/Division: Arts & Science
Departments: Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of History, University of Toronto
Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto)
Deadline / Closing Date for Application: November 15, 2015

The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of History, University of Toronto, invite applications for a tenure-stream appointment in the field of Medieval History. The appointment will be at the rank of Assistant Professor, to be held in the Centre for Medieval Studies (75%) and the Department of History (25%), and will begin on July 1, 2016.

Click here to download the full posting.

Academic Position Available, Old English Language and Literature

Position/Title Rank: Associate/Full Professor – Tenure Stream (Old English Language and Literature)
Faculty/Division: University of Toronto, Faculty of Arts & Science
Departments: Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of English
Campus: St. George (Downtown Toronto)
Deadline/Closing Date for Application: December 1, 2015

The Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto invites applications for the Cameron Professorship in Old English Language and Literature. This is a tenured appointment at the rank of Associate or Full Professor, to be held in the Centre for Medieval Studies (51%) and the Department of English (49%). The appointment will be effective July 1, 2016.

Click here to download the full posting.

From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages: Symposium Programme

October 1st & 2nd, 2015

The Working Group on Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages at the Centre for Medieval Studies is hosting a Symposium for scholars in the Toronto area this October 1st and 2nd. This event will feature keynotes by Nicholas Everett and Yitzhak Hen, as well as two days of panels where faculty and graduate students working in the field will present their research, followed by a reception.

 

Programme [download as pdf]:

Thursday, October 1st, Shook Common room

10:00-11:30 am: Keynote lecture 1

Yitzhak Hen, “The contraction of Arian identity in the post-Roman world”

11:30-12:00 pm: Coffee break

12:00-1:00 pm: Panel 1

Peter Johnsson, “Because he had no sons: using practice of adoption in Merovingian family to examine the function of fatherhood”

Valentine Pakis, “Men of Old, Men Who Grow Old, and Images of Men: A Shifting Interdiction in the Apology of Aristides”

1:00-2:30 pm: Lunch

2:30-3:30 pm: Panel 2

Eduardo Fabbro, “A useful example: Lombard women between vice and virtue”

Nicholas Wheeler, “An Historiography of Perjury: Between Ancient and Medieval Worlds”

 

Friday, October 2nd

10:00-11:30 am: Panel 3, Shook Common Room

Katie Menendez, “The Role of Exegesis in Complicating the Linear Narrative in Jonas of Bobbio’s Life of Columbanus

Dylan Wilkerson, “Source Study of Ælfric of Eynsham’s Lives of Saints and the Influence of Isidore of Seville on Anglo-Saxon Hagiography”

Julia Warnes, “The Irish scholar Dúngal: his life and learning”

11:30-12:00 pm: Coffee break

12:00-1:00 pm: Panel 4, Shook Common Room

Daniel Price, “Merovingian Hagiography the Hermeneutics of Everyday Life”

Matthew Mattingly, “Relic Cults and Monastic Reform in the North of Gaul, 750-1050”

1:00-2:30 pm: Lunch

2:30-3:30 pm: Panel 5, Great Hall, Lillian Massey Building

John Magee, “Observations on the Language and Identity of Calcidius”

Michael Herren, “The Epinal-Erfurt Glossary”

3:30-4:00 pm: Coffee break

4:00-5:30 pm: Keynote lecture 2, Great Hall, Lillian Massey Building

Nicholas Everett, “Hagiography as history in early medieval Italy”

5:30-7:30 pm: Wine & cheese reception, Shook Common Room

Fourth Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group

~ Off the Books: Making, Breaking, Binding, Burning, Leaving, Gathering  ~

9-11 October 2015
University of Toronto
Registration takes place at the Lillian Massey Building

 

Full program available here.

Co-sponsored by:
BABEL Working Group, Book History & Print Culture (UT), Centre for Comparative Literature (UT), Centre for Medieval Studies (UT), Department of Art (UT), Department of East Asian Studies (UT), Emilio Goggio Chair in Italian Studies (UT), Department of English (UT + UT-Scarborough), Department of English and Drama (UT-Mississauga), Department of French (UT), Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures (UT), Department of History (UT), Department of Spanish and Portuguese (UT), Department of Visual Studies (UT-Mississauga), Faculty of Music (UT), Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (UT), OBNS Lab (UT), The Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, punctum books, School of Graduate Studies (UT), and Victoria College (UT).

From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages: A Symposium

Fourth_ecumenical_council_of_chalcedon_-_1876

The Working Group on Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages at the Centre for Medieval Studies is hosting a Symposium for scholars in the Toronto area this October 1st and 2nd. This event will feature keynotes by Nicholas Everett and Yitzhak Hen, as well as two days of panels where faculty and graduate students working in the field of Late Antiquity present their research, followed by a reception.

Spanning the centuries from the conversion of Constantine to the new millennium, the period alternately designated Late Antiquity or the early Middle Ages was one of profound importance. From questions of religion and law to ethnicity and politics, from literature to demographics and more, scholars now more than ever have begun pushing the boundaries of our understanding of this period. At the University of Toronto, there are many of us doing just that from a broad range of different perspectives, and we hope you will join us in discussing our research at this event, held from 10 am on October 1st and 2nd in the Shook Common Room.

The Toronto Henry Daniel Project

The Toronto Henry Daniel Project seeks to make the two principal works of the English medical writer Henry Daniel (fl. ca. 1379), the Liber Uricrisiarum and the Herbal, accessible to scholars of Middle English literature and language, historians of medicine and science, and cultural historians.  Daniel’s works are long and thorough syntheses of Latin learning in the vernacular, the first dealing with both medical diagnosis and theory and the second with botanical knowledge directed toward therapeutic uses.  They are among the earliest such treatises in English, reveal a detailed knowledge of contemporary medical and herbal learning, but remain only minimally studied and nearly invisible to scholars.

The project is rooted in Professor E. Ruth Harvey’s detailed and foundational researches into the extant manuscripts of Daniel’s works and the late classical, Arabic, and Latin medical-historical traditions on which those works are based. Her close work with the many manuscripts of the Liber Uricrisiarum and the two surviving copies of the Herbal lies at the heart of the Project, especially in her analyses of the relationships among the multiple versions of Daniel’s treatises, both of which appear to have undergone authorial revision as well as later scribal manipulation.

The principal objectives of the Project are the following:

  • to generate reading editions of the Liber Uricrisiarum and the Herbal, with highly selective textual apparatus and annotations focused on identification of the many explicit source citations in Daniel’s works, and thereby pave the way for future critical editions and in-depth studies of those works;
  • to give historians of medicine, literary and linguistic scholars, and cultural historians access to these important vernacular syntheses of learned medical and herbal knowledge in the later Middle Ages;
  • to facilitate and encourage collaboration among scholars around the world who are working on Daniel’s writings, language, and cultural contexts;
  • to provide a “hub” website that will allow Daniel scholars to find fellow-researchers, resources, and a venue for sharing information.

We welcome collaboration from other scholars working on Henry Daniel and announcements of publications related to Daniel’s writings for posting on the forthcoming project website.

Bede and Aethelthryth: An Introduction to Christian Latin Poetics

Were rhetorical figures solely decorative, or were they intended to evoke particular responses at particular points in a narrative? When is chiasmus appropriate? When ought one to avoid alliteration? Bede hints at an answer in his treatise on rhetorical tropes and figures.

Stephen Harris (Associate Professor of English, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.) will give a lecture on “Bede and Aethelthryth: An Introduction to Christian Latin Poetics”

Thursday, 9 October 2014, 4:10 p.m.

Room 301, Centre for Medieval Studies
3rd Floor, Lillian Massey Building
125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

Stephen Harris is the author of Race and Ethnicity in Anglo-Saxon England (Routledge, 2003) and the forthcoming The Poetry of the Venerable Bede: A Commentary (West Virginia UP, 2015)

Canada Chaucer Seminar 2012

The 4th Annual Canada Chaucer Seminar is pleased to present a special two-day gathering in honour of Richard Firth Green, taking place at the University of Toronto, April 27–28, 2012.

Truth and Tales: Medieval Popular Culture and the Written Word

Keynote speakers will be Richard Firth Green (Ohio State), Barbara Hanawalt (Ohio State), and Andrew Taylor (Ottawa).

Other speakers include Thomas Hahn (Rochester), Michael Johnston (Purdue), Kathleen Kennedy (Penn State Brandywine), Lisa Kiser (Ohio State), Rachel Koopmans (York), Robyn Malo (Purdue), Alastair Minnis (Yale), William Robins (Toronto), Fiona Somerset (Duke), M.J. Toswell (Western Ontario), Michael Van Dussen (McGill), Nicholas Watson (Harvard), Karen Winstead (Ohio State), and Stephen Yeager (Wayne St).

All sessions will take place at the Centre for Medieval Studies, 125 Queen’s Park, 3rd Floor.

For the full program, please visit http://groups.chass.utoronto.ca/chaucer/

For further information, contact email hidden; JavaScript is required.