Congratulation to alumnus Connell Monette for his new publication, presented to the Pope in the presence of King Mohammed VI of Morocco!

Prof. Connell Monette (CMS 2008), Associate Professor of Religion, Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, recently co-authored a textbook entitled Introduction to Christianity. The book was commissioned by the Moroccan state to be used specifically for training male clerics (imams) and female clerics (murshidats) in Christian doctrine, for interfaith purposes.   The book was written in English, translated into Arabic, and published by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs and Endowments.

The Arabic and English editions were presented by the Minister of Islamic Affairs to Pope Francis, during the Papal visit to Rabat on Saturday 30th March, in the presence of King Mohammed VI of Morocco.
Prof. Connell Monette and his co-author, Rev. Karen Smith, were featured with the books on national television.  The official program has been posted online (you can listen to it in Spanish) and they appear with the books between 09:00 and 09:30, and the presentation of the books to the Pope (with the King and Minister) appears at 38:35.

New bilingual resource for learning about medieval manuscripts (a project involving CMS alumni and Faculty)

A new project, The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200, involves the work of several Centre faculty and alumni.

The two libraries have fully digitised eight hundred manuscripts from the eighth-twelfth centuries, all viewable online on a dedicated project page. The project also curated a bilingual website, Medieval England and France, 700-1200, that provides resources in both English and in French for learning more about the manuscripts, including videos and articles.

The Project Manager was Tuija Ainonen, a former student at the Centre, who has also written two articles, one on ‘Glossed Psalters’ and one on ‘Saints in medieval manuscripts’. Centre alumnus Damian Fleming has contributed an article on ‘Hebrew in Christian manuscripts of the early Middle Ages’, while CMS Assistant Professor Cillian O’Hogan has also written two articles, on ‘The Classical Past’ and ‘The Latin Middle Ages’. (Cillian also oversaw the development in 2016 of the British Library’s Greek Manuscripts website.) This work will help to promote the Middle Ages, and especially the detailed study of medieval manuscripts at the heart of the Centre’s program, to the general public. Congratulations to all!

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PS: if you watch the video on the website https://www.bl.uk/medieval-english-french-manuscripts/about-the-project, you can see Tuija (Ainonen) numerous times!

The 2019 Étienne Gilson Lecture with Prof. John van Engen

You are cordially invited to attend the 2019 Etienne Gilson Lecture presented by the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

“Fidelity, Faith, and Doubt in the Twelfth Century: Writings of William of St Thierry
in Their Cultural Context”

John Van Engen (University of Notre Dame)

4:00 pm, Thursday, 11 April 2019
 Rm 400, Muzzo Family Alumni Hall
 121 St. Joseph Street
 University of St. Michael’s CollegeScreen Shot 2019-04-03 at 3.37.08 PM
Reception to follow in the Laurence K. Shook Common Room
 Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
 59 Queen’s Park Crescent East

 

William of St-Thierry (1075/80–1148), a gifted and original monastic intellectual and writer, if often lost in the shadow of his friend Bernard of Clairvaux, wrote two works in the 1140’s on “faith” as such, this more or less a novelty and wrongly tied by scholars to the Abelard controversies. This talk situates those writings in his own life, and more broadly in the contested contemporary culture of schools and monasteries as well as courts.

John Van Engen taught Medieval History at the University of Notre Dame for forty years, and served during fourteen of those years as director of its Medieval Institute. He has written widely on medieval religion, twelfth-century culture and monasticism, medieval women writers, and late medieval movements such as the Devotio Moderna. He is currently completing the reconstruction and translation of the writings of a largely overlooked Netherlandish woman writer named Alijt Bake, to be published as The Writings of Alijt Bake of Utrecht and Ghent (1413–55): Teacher, Prioress, and Spiritual Autobiographer.

Lecture by Kathryn Kerby-Fulton–10 April 2019

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Professor Emerita of English, University of Notre Dame, will give a lecture on

“Songs of Work and Protest from the Vicars Choral of Late Medieval English Cathedrals: Lyrics of the Clerical Proletariat and the City in York, Norwich and London”

“Go’day,” bobbed carol with musical notation from Oxford, Bodleian Library, Arch. Selden B. 26 (SC 3340) f. 8."

“Go’day,” bobbed carol with musical notation from Oxford, Bodleian Library, Arch. Selden B. 26 (SC 3340) f. 8.”

Wednesday, 10 April 2019

 4:00 p.m.

Centre for Medieval Studies,

Room 310

3rd Floor, Lillian Massey Building

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

Congratulations to alumna Jessie Sherwood

Jessie SherwoodJessie Sherwood has just been hired as Associate Librarian with the Robbins Collections at Berkeley Law (University of California). Jessie obtained her PhD at CMS in 2006 (with Mark Meyerson as her supervisor) and then obtained a Masters of Library and Information Science at the University of Washington, Information School, in 2010. Her latest publication is entitled “Legal Responses to Crusading Violence Against Jews.” In Religious Minorities in Christian, Jewish and Muslim Law (5th-15th Centuries). Turnhout: Brepols, 2017.

 

The Robbins Collection promotes and sponsors comparative research and study in the fields of religious and civil law, and its materials attract students and leading scholars from universities and research institutions around the world. This position, in particular, will oversee original and complex copy cataloging and preservation of the Collection.

Annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture by William J. Courtenay on March 26th, 2019

The Friends of the PIMS Library invite you to attend

The annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture

“From the Blessed Hand: Papal Provisions and the University of Paris in the Fourteenth Century”

presented by

William J. Courtenay, Professor Emeritus

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Tuesday 26 March 2019, 4 pm

Alumni Hall, Room 100, University of St. Michael’s College

121 St. Joseph Street

 

Reception to follow, Shook Common Room, PIMS

59 Queen’s Park Crescent East

Congratulations to Prof. Bolintineanu who has won the CSDH/SCHN 2019 Outstanding Early Career Award

Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, teaching stream, who teaches courses in Medieval Digital Studies at the Centre and Woodsworth College, has just won the Outstanding Early Career Award of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities — Société Canadienne des Humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN).

Alexandra Bolintineanu

At the graduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches MST 3124H Medieval Studies in the Digital Age: From digitized corpora of texts and manuscripts to virtual and augmented-reality reconstructions of objects, buildings, and archaeological sites, the materials of medieval history, literature, and cultural heritage archives are increasingly entering the digital realm. The aims of this course are twofold.  The first aim is to familiarize students with the intellectual landscape of digital medieval studies—from editions, archives, and tools, to communities of practice and theoretical approaches.  The second aim is to invite students to critically engage with debates in the field of digital humanities from a medievalist’s point of view, examining the fault lines in digital tools and approaches that are revealed through their contact with fragile, fragmentary medieval data.

At the undergraduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches two courses through CMS:

MST201H1: Getting Medieval: Myths and Monsters

MST201 Description

Introduction to the sound, sight, and touch of the distant past, telling the story of the Middle Ages through objects from animal skin parchment to enameled icon. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring text- and narrative-oriented digital methods, along with medieval drama and music performance.

MST202H1: Getting Medieval: Place and Space

MST202 Description

From world maps to tales of pilgrimage, trade, and exploration, from imagined other worlds to historical cityscapes, this course tells the story of the Middle Ages through the places and spaces that defined medieval culture. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring network visualization and digital mapping.

Presentation by Christiane Gruber of her New Book, The Praiseworthy One

The Praiseworthy One: Devotional Images of the Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Traditions

by Christiane Gruber, Professor and Associate Chair in the History of Art. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 9.26.25 PMWednesday, March 6th, 2019

5:00-7:00 pm

Centre for Medieval Studies, Room 310

125 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C7

This presentation explores a number of paintings of the Prophet Muhammad produced in Persian and Turkish lands from the fourteenth century to the modern day. Ranging from veristic to abstract, these images represent Muhammad’s individual traits, primordial luminosity, and veiled essence. Their pictorial motifs reveal that artists engaged in abstract thought and turned to symbolic motifs in order to imagine Muhammad, the “praiseworthy” Prophet and Messenger of Islam.  The talk is related to Gruber’s recently published book, The Praiseworthy One: The Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Texts and Images. (Indiana University Press, 2019).

 

Reading and Q&A with author (and alumna) Helen Marshall for the release of her new publication

The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Old Books New Science Lab at the University of Toronto present the launch of Helen Marshall‘s The Migration

The Migration

Please join us for a reception followed by a reading and a Q&A with the Audience.

Friday, March 8th 2019 at 5:30 pmMarshall_Helen© Vince Haig 2018

Lillian Massey Building – Centre for Medieval Studies

Reception in The Great Hall (Room 312), reading in Room 310

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

This Event is Free

2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by Professor Gregory Hays

You are invited to the 2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by:

Professor Gregory Hays

Department of Classics, University of Virginia

“A World Without Letters: Fulgentius and his De aetatibus mundi et hominis

Friday, 1 March 2019

 4:10 p.m.

Room 301

Centre for Medieval Studies

125 Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

Reception to follow