Position available: research associate (limited term) – Old English

The Centre invites applications for a Research Associate (Limited Term) for a 1-year part-time appointment, with the possibility of renewal.  The anticipated start date is November 1, 2019. Review of applications will begin on August 26, 2019, however this position will remain open until filled. To apply, please click here.

The successful candidate will have a PhD by the time of appointment or shortly thereafter. Applicants must have expertise in Od English language, familiarity with the corpus of Old English, and excellent research ability. Knowledge of Latin is essential and proficiency in Old English paleography is desirable. The primary responsibility of the successful candidate will be to do preparatory work to support editors in writing entries for the Dictionary of Old English.

This position offers a rare opportunity to participate in team research in the humanities, and therefore requires the ability to work well with other members of the project.  For more information about the Dictionary of Old English, please visit our home page at http://www.doe.utoronto.ca.
Any questions regarding this position should be directed to Dr. Robert Getz getz@doe.utoronto.ca or Dr. Stephen Pelle pelle@doe.utoronto.ca.
To see a video about the project, click here:
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Congratulations to James P. Carley for his Gold Medal from the Bibliographical Society

Our colleague James P. Carley (CMS 1976) has been chosen as the recipient of the British Bibliographical Society‘s 2019 Gold Medal. Founded in 1892, the Bibliographical Society is the senior learned society dealing with the study of the book and its history. From time to time the Society awards a Gold Medal for distinguished services to bibliography to individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to the development of the subject and the furtherance of the Society’s aims. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, James Carley is also Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus at York University, Honorary Professor at the University of Kent, Honorary Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and Fellow at the Pontifical Institute. The presentation of the Gold Medal will take place before the lecture on Tuesday, 21 January 2020, at the Society of Antiquaries.Screen Shot 2019-07-07 at 2.25.19 PM

Congratulations to Talia Zajac for the Prize she won for a Recent Article

Talia Zajac (CMS 2017) won the Canadian Association of Ukrainian Studies’ Best Article in 2017-2018 Award for

“The Social-Political Roles of the Princess in Kyivan Rus’, ca. 945–1240.” In A Companion to Global Queenship. Ed. Elena Woodacre. Series Ed. Dymphna Evans. Leeds: ARC Humanities Press / Amsterdam University Press, 2018, 125–146.

ARC-COMP_Woodacre-Queenship_cover_8May2018A prize ceremony will take place at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC) during the 2019 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Public Lecture by Michelle P. Brown, June 6, 4pm, CMS

Join us for a talk by Dr Michelle P. Brown, formerly the Curator of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library and Professor of Medieval Manuscripts Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, where she now holds the status of Professor Emerita.

Her talk will be titled “The Eastwardness of Things: New Evidence for Early Medieval East-West Relations

sinai palimpsest overlay image[2]June 6, 2019

4:10pm

Centre for Medieval Studies

Lilliam Massey Bldg, Room 310

125 Queen’s Park Crescent

Reception to follow

Dr Brown’s visit has been sponsored by the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and the reception by the Centre for Medieval Studies.sinai0055

Congratulations to Michael Barbezat for his new position!

Michael Barbezat (CMS 2013) has recently become a research fellow in the Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne, Australia. The position is ongoing, with a five-year probation, dependant upon publications. His new institutional email is: michael.barbezat@acu.edu.au.

IMG_2448Regarding publications, Michael’s first book was out last December: Burning Bodies: Communities, Eschatology, and the Punishment of Heresy in the Middle Ages. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2018.

Among the most recent, one should also mention:

“‘He Doubted That These Things Actually Happened’: Knowing the Other World in the Tractatus de Purgatorio sancti Patricii.History of Religions 57.4 (2018): 321–347.

“Desire for Complete Enjoyment: The Use of the Latin Affectus in Hugh of St. Victor’s De archa Noe.” In Before Emotion: The Language of Feeling, 400–1800, edited by Juanita Feros Ruys, Michael Champion, and Kirk Essary, 76–85. New York: Routledge, 2019.

“A Conjuration of Patrick: A Legacy of Doubt and Imagining in Hamlet.” In Hamlet and Emotions, edited by Paul Megna, Bríd Phillips, and R. S. White, 41–59. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019.

“The Corporeal Orientation: A Medieval and Early Modern Framework for Understanding Deviance Through the Object(s) of Love.” In The Routledge History Handbook to Emotions in Europe, 1100–1700, edited by Susan Broomhall and Andrew Lynch. New York: Routledge, under contract.

Nomination of CMS Director Suzanne Akbari at the Institute for Advanced Study

CMS is both very sad and proud to announce that CMS Director Suzanne Akbari will become the new medievalist at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). Below is her letter announcing this news to us, at the Centre. If you want to read about her nomination (and great research), please click here. We hope to celebrate Prof. Akbari and thank her for her service as CMS Director in the early Fall.

“Dear CMS colleagues, both staff and faculty,

I’m writing to share some news, which some of you already are aware of (on a ‘need to know’ basis), but which only becomes public knowledge this week. I’ve been offered a faculty position in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, starting this fall. With the permission of the Dean, I will continue to be a regular faculty member at U of T in 2019-20, on an unpaid leave of absence; from 1 July 2020, I’ll be an associate member of the graduate faculty, able to continue to supervise doctoral students and sit on committees, and to take on new supervisions (jointly with a local U of T-based co-supervisor).Screen Shot 2019-05-22 at 7.35.08 PM

 With regard to graduate supervision and research activity, I think that very little will change: I will be keeping my apartment in Toronto and continuing to work on some collaborative research projects, and therefore in town about once a month, at least for the first year. I’ll still be up frequently thereafter, not least because my daughter Sara is staying in Toronto. I’m eager to remain a member of the CMS community, as completely as you’ll still have me.
This appointment came as a great surprise to me, and I’m still not quite settled in my mind. I didn’t apply for the job, and must have been nominated; immediately after the tentative offer, at the end of January, I was just shocked, and then delighted. In the last few weeks, though, I’ve become preoccupied by mixed feelings: pleased at this new opportunity to build community in a very different environment, and hopefully to have new avenues for public humanities engagement (which, as many of you know, is important to me); but also sad at leaving familiar environments, dear friends, colleagues, and students.
Best wishes,
Suzanne
Suzanne Conklin Akbari
Director, Centre for Medieval Studies (on leave, 2018-19)
Professor, English and Medieval Studies
University of Toronto”

Congratulation to alumnus Connell Monette for his new publication, presented to the Pope in the presence of King Mohammed VI of Morocco!

Prof. Connell Monette (CMS 2008), Associate Professor of Religion, Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, recently co-authored a textbook entitled Introduction to Christianity. The book was commissioned by the Moroccan state to be used specifically for training male clerics (imams) and female clerics (murshidats) in Christian doctrine, for interfaith purposes.   The book was written in English, translated into Arabic, and published by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs and Endowments.

The Arabic and English editions were presented by the Minister of Islamic Affairs to Pope Francis, during the Papal visit to Rabat on Saturday 30th March, in the presence of King Mohammed VI of Morocco.
Prof. Connell Monette and his co-author, Rev. Karen Smith, were featured with the books on national television.  The official program has been posted online (you can listen to it in Spanish) and they appear with the books between 09:00 and 09:30, and the presentation of the books to the Pope (with the King and Minister) appears at 38:35.

New bilingual resource for learning about medieval manuscripts (a project involving CMS alumni and Faculty)

A new project, The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200, involves the work of several Centre faculty and alumni.

The two libraries have fully digitised eight hundred manuscripts from the eighth-twelfth centuries, all viewable online on a dedicated project page. The project also curated a bilingual website, Medieval England and France, 700-1200, that provides resources in both English and in French for learning more about the manuscripts, including videos and articles.

The Project Manager was Tuija Ainonen, a former student at the Centre, who has also written two articles, one on ‘Glossed Psalters’ and one on ‘Saints in medieval manuscripts’. Centre alumnus Damian Fleming has contributed an article on ‘Hebrew in Christian manuscripts of the early Middle Ages’, while CMS Assistant Professor Cillian O’Hogan has also written two articles, on ‘The Classical Past’ and ‘The Latin Middle Ages’. (Cillian also oversaw the development in 2016 of the British Library’s Greek Manuscripts website.) This work will help to promote the Middle Ages, and especially the detailed study of medieval manuscripts at the heart of the Centre’s program, to the general public. Congratulations to all!

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PS: if you watch the video on the website https://www.bl.uk/medieval-english-french-manuscripts/about-the-project, you can see Tuija (Ainonen) numerous times!

The 2019 Étienne Gilson Lecture with Prof. John van Engen

You are cordially invited to attend the 2019 Etienne Gilson Lecture presented by the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

“Fidelity, Faith, and Doubt in the Twelfth Century: Writings of William of St Thierry
in Their Cultural Context”

John Van Engen (University of Notre Dame)

4:00 pm, Thursday, 11 April 2019
 Rm 400, Muzzo Family Alumni Hall
 121 St. Joseph Street
 University of St. Michael’s CollegeScreen Shot 2019-04-03 at 3.37.08 PM
Reception to follow in the Laurence K. Shook Common Room
 Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
 59 Queen’s Park Crescent East

 

William of St-Thierry (1075/80–1148), a gifted and original monastic intellectual and writer, if often lost in the shadow of his friend Bernard of Clairvaux, wrote two works in the 1140’s on “faith” as such, this more or less a novelty and wrongly tied by scholars to the Abelard controversies. This talk situates those writings in his own life, and more broadly in the contested contemporary culture of schools and monasteries as well as courts.

John Van Engen taught Medieval History at the University of Notre Dame for forty years, and served during fourteen of those years as director of its Medieval Institute. He has written widely on medieval religion, twelfth-century culture and monasticism, medieval women writers, and late medieval movements such as the Devotio Moderna. He is currently completing the reconstruction and translation of the writings of a largely overlooked Netherlandish woman writer named Alijt Bake, to be published as The Writings of Alijt Bake of Utrecht and Ghent (1413–55): Teacher, Prioress, and Spiritual Autobiographer.