Annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture by William J. Courtenay on March 26th, 2019

The Friends of the PIMS Library invite you to attend

The annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture

“From the Blessed Hand: Papal Provisions and the University of Paris in the Fourteenth Century”

presented by

William J. Courtenay, Professor Emeritus

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Tuesday 26 March 2019, 4 pm

Alumni Hall, Room 100, University of St. Michael’s College

121 St. Joseph Street

 

Reception to follow, Shook Common Room, PIMS

59 Queen’s Park Crescent East

Congratulations to Prof. Bolintineanu who has won the CSDH/SCHN 2019 Outstanding Early Career Award

Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, teaching stream, who teaches courses in Medieval Digital Studies at the Centre and Woodsworth College, has just won the Outstanding Early Career Award of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities — Société Canadienne des Humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN).

Alexandra Bolintineanu

At the graduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches MST 3124H Medieval Studies in the Digital Age: From digitized corpora of texts and manuscripts to virtual and augmented-reality reconstructions of objects, buildings, and archaeological sites, the materials of medieval history, literature, and cultural heritage archives are increasingly entering the digital realm. The aims of this course are twofold.  The first aim is to familiarize students with the intellectual landscape of digital medieval studies—from editions, archives, and tools, to communities of practice and theoretical approaches.  The second aim is to invite students to critically engage with debates in the field of digital humanities from a medievalist’s point of view, examining the fault lines in digital tools and approaches that are revealed through their contact with fragile, fragmentary medieval data.

At the undergraduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches two courses through CMS:

MST201H1: Getting Medieval: Myths and Monsters

MST201 Description

Introduction to the sound, sight, and touch of the distant past, telling the story of the Middle Ages through objects from animal skin parchment to enameled icon. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring text- and narrative-oriented digital methods, along with medieval drama and music performance.

MST202H1: Getting Medieval: Place and Space

MST202 Description

From world maps to tales of pilgrimage, trade, and exploration, from imagined other worlds to historical cityscapes, this course tells the story of the Middle Ages through the places and spaces that defined medieval culture. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring network visualization and digital mapping.

Presentation by Christiane Gruber of her New Book, The Praiseworthy One

The Praiseworthy One: Devotional Images of the Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Traditions

by Christiane Gruber, Professor and Associate Chair in the History of Art. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 9.26.25 PMWednesday, March 6th, 2019

5:00-7:00 pm

Centre for Medieval Studies, Room 310

125 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C7

This presentation explores a number of paintings of the Prophet Muhammad produced in Persian and Turkish lands from the fourteenth century to the modern day. Ranging from veristic to abstract, these images represent Muhammad’s individual traits, primordial luminosity, and veiled essence. Their pictorial motifs reveal that artists engaged in abstract thought and turned to symbolic motifs in order to imagine Muhammad, the “praiseworthy” Prophet and Messenger of Islam.  The talk is related to Gruber’s recently published book, The Praiseworthy One: The Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Texts and Images. (Indiana University Press, 2019).

 

Reading and Q&A with author (and alumna) Helen Marshall for the release of her new publication

The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Old Books New Science Lab at the University of Toronto present the launch of Helen Marshall‘s The Migration

The Migration

Please join us for a reception followed by a reading and a Q&A with the Audience.

Friday, March 8th 2019 at 5:30 pmMarshall_Helen© Vince Haig 2018

Lillian Massey Building – Centre for Medieval Studies

Reception in The Great Hall (Room 312), reading in Room 310

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

This Event is Free

2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by Professor Gregory Hays

You are invited to the 2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by:

Professor Gregory Hays

Department of Classics, University of Virginia

“A World Without Letters: Fulgentius and his De aetatibus mundi et hominis

Friday, 1 March 2019

 4:10 p.m.

Room 301

Centre for Medieval Studies

125 Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

Reception to follow

Congratulations to Ann Marie Rasmussen for her new publication!

Rivalrous Masculinities. New Directions in Medieval Gender Studies, edited by Ann Marie Rasmussen. Notre Dame Press.Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 2.17.58 PM

Here is a new edited collection that may interest a broad cross-section of scholars. Bringing together the work of both leading and emerging scholars in the field of medieval gender studies, the essays in Rivalrous Masculinities advance our understanding of medieval masculinity as a pluralized category and as an intersectional category of gender.  In order to ground this intersectional and interdisciplinary approach with the appropriate disciplinary expertise, the essays in this volume represent a broad cross-section of disciplines: art history, religious studies, history, and French, Italian, German, Yiddish, Middle English, and Old English literature. Together, they open up new intellectual vistas for future research in the field of medieval gender studies.

Congratulations to Professors Alexandra Gillespie and Suzanne Akbari for the funding they received from the Mellon Foundation for their project “The Book and the Silk Roads”

In December the University of Toronto was awarded $1.25 million (Canadian dollars) by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the initial phase of a collaboration led by Professor Alex Gillespie and co-principal investigators Professor Suzanne Akbari (Centre for Medieval Studies) and Sian Meikle (University of Toronto Libraries Information Technology Services). Together they are undertaking an international research initiative to investigate the origins and development of book bindings in the project “The Book and the Silk Roads.”

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127(322), detail of the book binding

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127 (322), detail of the book binding (picture taken by Cécile Treffort)

“The picture that will emerge based on this research will be richer and more complex than what we previously knew about the history of the book,” says Gillespie.

For more information, please read “An Open Book.”

A.G. Rigg obituary

Image

We acknowledge with deep sadness the death of Professor A.G. Rigg on Monday, 7 January 2019.

George, as he was known universally to friends, colleagues, and generations of admiring and grateful students, died peacefully at home, in the presence of his beloved wife Jennifer, after a period of declining health.

A.G. Rigg photo_May2018

A.G. Rigg, May 2018

George was born on 17 February 1937 at Wigan, Lancashire, where he received his secondary education at Wigan Grammar School, which was known for its strong reputation in Classics. As an undergraduate he attended Pembroke College, Oxford from 1955 to 1959 leading to a B.A. in the English School.  He wrote his D. Phil thesis, “An edition of a fifteenth‑century commonplace book,” under the supervision of Norman Davis. That work was published in 1968 as A Glastonbury Miscellany of the Fifteenth Century: a descriptive Index of Trinity College, Cambridge, MS 0.9.38.  Concurrently with his doctoral work he taught at Merton College, Oxford, when he first met Jennifer, as well later at Balliol College. From 1966 to 1968 he held a Visiting Assistant Professorship in the Department of English at Stanford University. In 1968 he took the position of Assistant Professor in the newly formed Centre for Medieval Studies and the Department of English at the University of Toronto, where he taught until his reluctant retirement (still mandated by law at 65) in 2002. As an emeritus, his generous and energetic mentorship of graduate students continued for many years thereafter.

His exacting philological standards secured his international reputation as a scholar of medieval Latin as well as of Middle English. His editions included the poems of Walter of Wimborne (1978), his controversial edition of the Z-Text of Piers Plowman (1983, with Charlotte Brewer) and a glossed epitome of Geoffrey of Monmouth, A Book of British Kings (2000). The latter was published as volume 30 of the Toronto Medieval Latin Texts, a series that George established and for which he served as general editor for its first thirty volumes. His many articles included a signal series of codicological studies of medieval Latin poetic anthologies which appeared in Mediaeval Studies. Medieval Latin: An Introduction and Bibliographical Guide, co-edited with Frank Mantello, remains an invaluable resource for students of the field, while his magisterial survey, Anglo-Latin Literature, 1066-1422, published in 1992, will remain the definitive reference work for decades to come.  He was elected Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America in 1997 and of the Royal Society of Canada in 1998.

His passionate advocacy for reading competence in medieval Latin as a central feature of serious advanced training in medieval studies led to the creation of the Committee for Medieval Latin Studies, which he chaired from its inception until his retirement, and to the system of examinations that remains a hallmark of a Toronto training in the field. It was his tireless and exacting but endlessly patient encouragement of students in their pursuit of a notoriously rigorous standard that exposed the greatest number of Toronto graduate students to his teaching over the years. Those who took his seminars, and above all those who benefitted from his kindness, enthusiasm, and bonhomie as their doctoral supervisor experienced even more abundantly his rare combination of extraordinary erudition, good humour, genuine humility, and quiet empathy.

We are all of us the poorer for the loss of this kind, good, and brilliant man. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer Rigg, sisters-in-law Joanne Hope and Ann Nicholson, and by his nephew, Rupert Hope. Warmest thanks to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care for their unfailing kindness and support.

There will be a small ceremony at 11:00 am on Saturday, 19 January 2019, Humphrey Funeral Home, 1403 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON.  Phone: 416-487-4523.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to an animal rescue shelter or a charity of your choice.

The Centre hopes to hold a memorial on the University of Toronto campus in the Spring, and an informal remembrance at the Medieval Congress at Kalamazoo prior to the annual CMS reception; details to follow.

 

David Townsend

Professor Emeritus of Medieval Studies and English

University of Toronto

 

Prestigious TATP Teaching Excellence Award: one CMS PhD student short-listed

Every year, the Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation offers awards to the best Teaching Assistants on campus. Only twelve TAs make it to the short-list among hundreds nominated. Of these twelve short-listed in 2017, one was a PhD student from the Centre for Medieval Studies: Lochin Brouillard. CONGRATULATIONS!

Lochin 1Here are some extracts of the letter written for Lochin by the professor who nominated her. “Lochin has been my T.A. in the VIC 343Y ‘Sex and Gender in the Renaissance’ for the past three years and has gained my absolute trust and admiration for the great work she has done in the course. […] One reason for Lochin’s great success as a TA is her profound dedication to teaching and to helping students do their best. She mentors students on a one-to-one basis, learns their name, draws them into the discussion, and makes them feel at home and valued. Another reason is Lochin’s own character – open, friendly, relaxed, supportive. She epitomizes the best of what a teacher should be. She always has a smile on her lips and great ideas in her mind – she engages with students and contributes to class discussions with ease and elegance, and also with profound knowledge of the materials and the field. And she manages to steer a clear, scholarly course without infringing on anyone’s sensibilities (not an easy task on a course on ‘sex and gender’).”

The Teaching Assistants’ Training Program’s (TATP) Teaching Excellence Award was created in 2003 to recognize the outstanding contributions of teaching assistants across all four divisions in the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto. The award seeks to value the work of TAs who regularly inspire and challenge undergraduate students. It means that the individuals who won this award and the ones who were short-listed for it can count themselves among the University’s top TAs!

CMS does not have an undergraduate component to its program. Therefore our PhD students are sometimes frustrated as they cannot TA as much as they would like. The fact that one of the twelve TAs short-listed by TATP this year, two from last year (Amanda Wetmore who won the award and Nicholas Wheeler), and already one in 2015 (Michael Fatigati) were from CMS is the perfect proof that any institution hiring CMS students gets the service of extremely talented and incredibly knowledgeable TAs.