Lecture by Kathryn Kerby-Fulton–10 April 2019

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Professor Emerita of English, University of Notre Dame, will give a lecture on

“Songs of Work and Protest from the Vicars Choral of Late Medieval English Cathedrals: Lyrics of the Clerical Proletariat and the City in York, Norwich and London”

“Go’day,” bobbed carol with musical notation from Oxford, Bodleian Library, Arch. Selden B. 26 (SC 3340) f. 8."

“Go’day,” bobbed carol with musical notation from Oxford, Bodleian Library, Arch. Selden B. 26 (SC 3340) f. 8.”

Wednesday, 10 April 2019

 4:00 p.m.

Centre for Medieval Studies,

Room 310

3rd Floor, Lillian Massey Building

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

Congratulations to alumna Jessie Sherwood

Jessie SherwoodJessie Sherwood has just been hired as Associate Librarian with the Robbins Collections at Berkeley Law (University of California). Jessie obtained her PhD at CMS in 2006 (with Mark Meyerson as her supervisor) and then obtained a Masters of Library and Information Science at the University of Washington, Information School, in 2010. Her latest publication is entitled “Legal Responses to Crusading Violence Against Jews.” In Religious Minorities in Christian, Jewish and Muslim Law (5th-15th Centuries). Turnhout: Brepols, 2017.

 

The Robbins Collection promotes and sponsors comparative research and study in the fields of religious and civil law, and its materials attract students and leading scholars from universities and research institutions around the world. This position, in particular, will oversee original and complex copy cataloging and preservation of the Collection.

Annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture by William J. Courtenay on March 26th, 2019

The Friends of the PIMS Library invite you to attend

The annual Leonard E. Boyle Lecture

“From the Blessed Hand: Papal Provisions and the University of Paris in the Fourteenth Century”

presented by

William J. Courtenay, Professor Emeritus

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Tuesday 26 March 2019, 4 pm

Alumni Hall, Room 100, University of St. Michael’s College

121 St. Joseph Street

 

Reception to follow, Shook Common Room, PIMS

59 Queen’s Park Crescent East

Congratulations to Prof. Bolintineanu who has won the CSDH/SCHN 2019 Outstanding Early Career Award

Alexandra Bolintineanu, Assistant Professor, teaching stream, who teaches courses in Medieval Digital Studies at the Centre and Woodsworth College, has just won the Outstanding Early Career Award of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities — Société Canadienne des Humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN).

Alexandra Bolintineanu

At the graduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches MST 3124H Medieval Studies in the Digital Age: From digitized corpora of texts and manuscripts to virtual and augmented-reality reconstructions of objects, buildings, and archaeological sites, the materials of medieval history, literature, and cultural heritage archives are increasingly entering the digital realm. The aims of this course are twofold.  The first aim is to familiarize students with the intellectual landscape of digital medieval studies—from editions, archives, and tools, to communities of practice and theoretical approaches.  The second aim is to invite students to critically engage with debates in the field of digital humanities from a medievalist’s point of view, examining the fault lines in digital tools and approaches that are revealed through their contact with fragile, fragmentary medieval data.

At the undergraduate level, Prof. Bolintineanu teaches two courses through CMS:

MST201H1: Getting Medieval: Myths and Monsters

MST201 Description

Introduction to the sound, sight, and touch of the distant past, telling the story of the Middle Ages through objects from animal skin parchment to enameled icon. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring text- and narrative-oriented digital methods, along with medieval drama and music performance.

MST202H1: Getting Medieval: Place and Space

MST202 Description

From world maps to tales of pilgrimage, trade, and exploration, from imagined other worlds to historical cityscapes, this course tells the story of the Middle Ages through the places and spaces that defined medieval culture. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring network visualization and digital mapping.

Presentation by Christiane Gruber of her New Book, The Praiseworthy One

The Praiseworthy One: Devotional Images of the Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Traditions

by Christiane Gruber, Professor and Associate Chair in the History of Art. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 9.26.25 PMWednesday, March 6th, 2019

5:00-7:00 pm

Centre for Medieval Studies, Room 310

125 Queens Park, Toronto, ON M5S 2C7

This presentation explores a number of paintings of the Prophet Muhammad produced in Persian and Turkish lands from the fourteenth century to the modern day. Ranging from veristic to abstract, these images represent Muhammad’s individual traits, primordial luminosity, and veiled essence. Their pictorial motifs reveal that artists engaged in abstract thought and turned to symbolic motifs in order to imagine Muhammad, the “praiseworthy” Prophet and Messenger of Islam.  The talk is related to Gruber’s recently published book, The Praiseworthy One: The Prophet Muhammad in Islamic Texts and Images. (Indiana University Press, 2019).

 

Reading and Q&A with author (and alumna) Helen Marshall for the release of her new publication

The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Old Books New Science Lab at the University of Toronto present the launch of Helen Marshall‘s The Migration

The Migration

Please join us for a reception followed by a reading and a Q&A with the Audience.

Friday, March 8th 2019 at 5:30 pmMarshall_Helen© Vince Haig 2018

Lillian Massey Building – Centre for Medieval Studies

Reception in The Great Hall (Room 312), reading in Room 310

125 Queen’s Park, Toronto

This Event is Free

2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by Professor Gregory Hays

You are invited to the 2018-19 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies lecture by:

Professor Gregory Hays

Department of Classics, University of Virginia

“A World Without Letters: Fulgentius and his De aetatibus mundi et hominis

Friday, 1 March 2019

 4:10 p.m.

Room 301

Centre for Medieval Studies

125 Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

Reception to follow

Congratulations to Ann Marie Rasmussen for her new publication!

Rivalrous Masculinities. New Directions in Medieval Gender Studies, edited by Ann Marie Rasmussen. Notre Dame Press.Screen Shot 2019-02-21 at 2.17.58 PM

Here is a new edited collection that may interest a broad cross-section of scholars. Bringing together the work of both leading and emerging scholars in the field of medieval gender studies, the essays in Rivalrous Masculinities advance our understanding of medieval masculinity as a pluralized category and as an intersectional category of gender.  In order to ground this intersectional and interdisciplinary approach with the appropriate disciplinary expertise, the essays in this volume represent a broad cross-section of disciplines: art history, religious studies, history, and French, Italian, German, Yiddish, Middle English, and Old English literature. Together, they open up new intellectual vistas for future research in the field of medieval gender studies.

Congratulations to Professors Alexandra Gillespie and Suzanne Akbari for the funding they received from the Mellon Foundation for their project “The Book and the Silk Roads”

In December the University of Toronto was awarded $1.25 million (Canadian dollars) by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the initial phase of a collaboration led by Professor Alex Gillespie and co-principal investigators Professor Suzanne Akbari (Centre for Medieval Studies) and Sian Meikle (University of Toronto Libraries Information Technology Services). Together they are undertaking an international research initiative to investigate the origins and development of book bindings in the project “The Book and the Silk Roads.”

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127(322), detail of the book binding

Poitiers, Bibliothèque municipale, ms 127 (322), detail of the book binding (picture taken by Cécile Treffort)

“The picture that will emerge based on this research will be richer and more complex than what we previously knew about the history of the book,” says Gillespie.

For more information, please read “An Open Book.”