Upcoming Toronto meeting of the MAA, 6-8 April 2017

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The Centre for Medieval Studies and the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies will soon be the hosts of the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America.
Capture d’écran 2016-02-15 à 10.08.34 PMIt will take place in downtown Toronto, on the St. George campus of the University of Toronto. For more information, please consult the meeting website.

There will be selected parts of the program held at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the closing plenary at Aga Khan Museum. There will also be an optional excursion to the oldest European settlement in Ontario (1615), the Jesuit mission of Sainte-Marie-Among-the-Hurons, and the Shrine of the Canadian Martyrs in Midland, Ontario.

The conference (held on 6-8 April 2017 and followed by the CARA meeting on 9 April) will feature three plenary speakers and over fifty concurrent sessions, including thematic threads such as ‘The Medieval Mediterranean,’ ‘Manuscript Studies,’ ‘Old English Studies’ and many others. Roundtable discussions will focus on topics such as K-12 education, diversity in the medieval studies classroom, compatible careers, and scholarly publication in the age of Open Access. Registration will begin on 6 February 2017 but you are encouraged to make hotel bookings as soon as possible (information on the conference website).

Second International Seminar on Critical Approaches to Dante, 4-5 April

The Second International Seminar on Critical Approaches to Dante will be taking place on Saturday and Sunday, 4th and 5th of April 2017.

2016-2017_Poster--768x1038

In 2015 the world celebrated the 750th anniversary of Dante’s birth and started preparing the celebrations for the upcoming anniversary of his death. No need to say, these anniversaries concern, more than Dante himself, Dante’s readers. What one should celebrate and discuss are centuries of readings, both silent and aloud; of commentaries and doubts; of creation of ad hoc hermeneutic tools and of import-export of interpretative categories from different disciplinary fields. Indeed, no other author and no other work have offered, from the very beginning, a hermeneutic workshop of equal richness. Not only have new interpretative theories been tested here, but Dante’s work has also become the shared space in which different critical traditions meet and interact with one another. The variety of the tools of interpretation and modes of reading of Dante’s work are also a problematic heritage, transmitted and augmented by each successive generation, sometimes to the point of making Dante criticism a true “dark wood” for those readers who approach it with the goal of simply understanding Dante.

Interdisciplinary by nature, ISCAD provides a space of discussion and elaboration among scholars coming from Dante Studies as well as from different traditions of studies, by crossing a variety of methodological approaches: history of key-categories in Dante studies and related fields of study; case-studies to investigate the application of these categories to single episodes of Dante’s work; discussion of the uses and abuses of these categories in Dante Studies and beyond.

 

The conference’s website can be consulted here.

The full conference’s program is available here.

The poster can be downloaded here.

 

Organizing Committee

E. Brilli (University of Toronto), W. Robins (Victoria University & University of Toronto), J. Steinberg (University of Chicago & Editor-in-Chief, Dante Studies), A. Zambenedetti (University of Toronto)

Convener

Elisa Brilli (University of Toronto)

Research Assistant

Benedetta Lamanna (University of Toronto)

 

The conference is sponsored by the

Centre for Comparative Literature, Centre for Medieval Studies, Cinema Studies InstituteDepartment of Italian StudiesDepartment of Language StudiesEmilio Goggio Chair in Italian StudiesFaculty of Arts and ScienceIstituto italiano di Cultura di TorontoPontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Social Sciences and Humanities Research CouncilUniversity of Saint Michael’s College.

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Congratulations to Nick Everett for his new book!

Nicholas Everett, Patron Saints of Early Medieval Italy AD c.350-800: History and Hagiography in Ten Biographies, a translation with a commentary and introduction, Durham Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Translations 5, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies Press, 2017.

Nick Everett's Patron Saints

These Lives or Passions recorded for early medieval audiences the difficulties their local patron saints encountered in promoting the new religion, and their sufferings at the hands of resistant pagans and Roman authorities – ordeals that qualified these saints as special protectors or guardians over their cities or regions. Full of tales of courage, torture, assistant angels, mischievous devils, dragons, and monsters, these earliest Lives also served as literary and devotional touchstones for later elaborations, medieval and modern, on the saints’ lives, careers, and cults. With a comprehensive introduction and historical commentary to each biography, Patron Saints of Early Medieval Italy provides new evidence for understanding the transition from the ancient Roman world to the Middle Ages. In assessing the technical problems relating to the origin and date of composition of each text, Patron Saints also contributes to redeeming these valuable but neglected sources for the history of medieval Italy. It also discusses the historical and literary significance of these biographies within the contexts of hagiography as a literary genre and early medieval religious life.

 

“This volume of readable translations of the most significant early medieval Italian saints’ lives, with excellent historical commentary, is much more than a set of literary texts expertly translated from Latin into English. It is an important contribution to debates about the nature of early Italian hagiography and the potential use of the whole genre by historians. As Nicholas Everett is the expert in this field, the volume is to be warmly welcomed by students and scholars alike.”

Ross Balzaretti
University of Nottingham

Toronto medievalists at IMC Kalamazoo 2017

A strong contingent of faculty members and students at the Centre for Medieval Studies will be presenting papers or organizing sessions at the 52th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, May 11-14 2017.

 

Papers

Suzanne Conklin Akbari, “The Material Landscape of Knowledge in the Chemin de long estude

Suzanne Conklin Akbari, “Working as (if ) a Man: Relative Genders in the Academic Workplace” (Roundtable)

Benjamin S.W. Barootes, “Et in Calculo Nomen Novum Scriptum”: Pearl and the Holy Name of Jesus”

Alexandra Bauer, “Law and Lawlessness in the Case of the “Peterborough Witch””

Alexandra Bolintineanu, “The Reluctant Old English Corpus”

Alexandra Bolintineanu, “Interoperable Manuscripts for Research and Teaching (A Workshop)”

Isabelle Cochelin, “The Double Lock within Monasteries, Tenth–Eleventh Centuries”

Kara Gaston, “Decapitation, Self-Reflection: The View from the Spheres in Lucan, Boccaccio, and Chaucer”

Alexandra Gillespie, “Digital Tools for Manuscript Study: Collation and The Canterbury Tales

Ryan Hall, “The Meaning of Latinity in Alfredian Translation”

Jessica Henderson, “Medical Books: The Case of Takamiya 46 and BL Additional 17866”

Yolanda Iglesias and David Navarro, “New Approaches to Siete Partidas and the 1272 Revolt of the Nobles”

Jared Johnson, “An Apology for Medicine in Walahfrid Strabo’s De cultura hortorum

Shirley Kinney, “Cut to the Quick: Horse-Maiming in Medieval England and Wales”

Matthew Orsag, ““Los Sabios Antiguos”: The Sources of Alfonso X’s Las Siete Partidas

Stephen Pelle, “Twelfth-Century Glosses and Revisions in a Manuscript of Ælfric’s Homilies”

Courtney Selvage, “Saint Adomnán, Iona, and the Political Nature of Cáin Adomnáin

Matthew Sergi, “New Approaches to Drama Records: East Anglian Play Texts and Nearby Archives”

Morris Tichenor, “Cicero’s De oratore and Orator in Medieval England”

Julia Tomlinson, “Jerusalem Relics and the Feast of Relics in Late Medieval England”

Michael F. Webb, “Spaces, Signs, and Original Charters in the Cartulary of the Cathedral Church of Angoulême”

Amanda Wetmore, ““Wrastlyng wiþ þat blynde nou3t”: Binding and Blinding in The Cloud of Unknowing”

Nicholas Wheeler, “The Oath at Ravenna”

Elise Williams, “Medical Maths, or, How I Learned to Love a Graph”

Anna Wilson, “Digital Reading Practices and Lydgate’s Chaucerian Fanfiction”(Roundtable)

Sean M. Winslow, “The Ethiopian Book between Christendom and Islam”

Talia Zajac, “Rus-Born Brides of Polish Rulers and Their Objects in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries: Three Case Studies of Cultural Transfer”

 

Organizers

Suzanne Conklin Akbari, “Neighboring Languages and Cross-Cultural Exchange: Persian/Arabic, French/English”

Benjamin S.W. Barootes, “Ihesu Dulcis: Devotion to the Holy Name in Medieval Europe”

Claude L. Evans (Ancient Abbeys of Brittany Project), “Cistercian Abbeys of Brittany”

Yolanda Iglesias, “Revisiting Alphonsine Historiography and Legislation”

Morris Tichenor, “Medieval Lives and Afterlives of the Classical Poets”

Dylan M. Wilkerson, “Old English Religious Texts after the Norman Conquest”

Anna Wilson, “Fanfiction in Medieval Studies: What Do We Mean When We Say “Fanfiction”?”

 

Two Toronto ensembles will also perform on Saturday evening, May 13:

Floris and Blancheflour, Pneuma Ensemble

Complex Dulcitius, or Sex in the Kitchen, Poculi Ludique Societas (PLS)

$15.00 General Admission

$10.00 presale through online Congress registration

It’s “Toronto night” at the festival! Toronto’s Pneuma Ensemble shares a period musical presentation of the first extant romance in English, before the venerable PLS performs Colleen Butler’s new translation of Hrosvit’s tenth-century tragicomedy about the Roman emperor lured into carnal embrace with cookware.

Don’t forget to attend our reception, held jointly with the University of Toronto Press:

Thursday, May 11, 9:00 p.m at Harrison 302 inside Valley III building

 

J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture: Monika Otter – 3 March 2017

2016-17 J.R. O’Donnell Memorial Lecture in Medieval Studies

PROFESSOR MONIKA OTTER

(Department of English, Dartmouth College)

 

“Magnum iocum dare: Literature as Play in the Eleventh Century”

 

Friday, 3 March 2017

4:10 p.m.

Room 310, Centre for Medieval Studies

125 Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

 

Reception to follow

 

This lecture series is free and open to the public. If you have an accessibility or accommodation need for this event, please contact the Centre for Medieval Studies email hidden; JavaScript is required 416 978 4884

 

Jointly sponsored by: The Centre for Medieval Studies, Centre for Comparative Literature, Department of Classics, JMLAT

 

George Rigg Visiting Scholar: Monika Otter – 2 March 2017

The Centre for Medieval Studies is pleased to welcome

 

PROFESSOR MONIKA OTTER (Department of English, Dartmouth College)

 for the George Rigg Visitorship in Medieval Latin Studies seminar.

 

“Theatricalities: Voicing, Embodiment, and the Ecbasis Captivi

 

Thursday, 2 March 2017

4:00 PM

Room 310, Lillian Massey Building

125 Queen’s Park, 3rd Floor

Toronto, Ontario

 

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND THIS INFORMAL SEMINAR.

For advance copies of materials for the seminar, please contact David Townsend (email hidden; JavaScript is required)

TRaCE Report on CMS Graduates’ PhD Experience and Career

In 2016, the Centre of Medieval Studies was chosen as one of three University of Toronto humanities departments to become part of the TRaCE project, a Canada-wide collaborative project involving twenty-five universities. The aim of the project was to collect data on the careers of PhD students in the humanities who graduated between 2004 and 2014, interview them about their past and present professional experiences, and reconnect them to the university.

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This research was conducted by Lochin Brouillard, a PhD candidate at the Centre, who compiled the trends emerging from the interviews in the report linked below. Narratives of CMS alumnae and alumni, including Damian Fleming, Victoria Goddard, Helen Marshall, and Connell Monette, have also been published on the TRaCE website. The Centre’s active role in the TRaCE project provides us with the means to pursue our ongoing effort to foster links among all members of our community – graduates, students, faculty members, and research associates.

For a full report on the TRaCE activity at CMS, see the TRaCE Report compiled by Lochin Brouillard.

 

Medieval Ethiopia: A Colloquium – 10-11 March 2017

The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Gabriel and Michael, late 15th-early 16th century. Tempera on parchment. Gospel manuscript from the Monastery of Gunda Gunde (Tigray, Ethiopia); digital image courtesy of the DSU, UTSC Library (©M. Gervers, 2002)

The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Gabriel and Michael, late 15th-early 16th century.
Tempera on parchment. Gospel manuscript from the Monastery of Gunda Gunde (Tigray, Ethiopia); digital image courtesy of the DSU, UTSC Library (©M. Gervers, 2002)

For a downloadable version of the programme, see the Medieval Ethiopia Colloquium poster.

Friday 10 March 2017

Plenary lecture:

4:30-6:00 pm               Columba Stewart, OSB (Hill Museum and Manuscript Library): “The Pioneering Work of the Ethiopian Manuscript Microfilm Library (EMML) and How Its Challenges and Mission Endure in the Digital Age”

St. Michael’s College, Muzzo Family Alumni Hall 100, 121 St. Joseph Street

 

Saturday 11 March 2017

Colloquium:

All sessions held in Room 310, Lillian Massey Building (Centre for Medieval Studies), 125 Queen’s Park

9:15-9:30 am               Opening remarks

9:30-10:30 am             Wendy Belcher (Princeton University): “The Riches of the Ethiopian Archive: Lives, Literature, and Legends”

10:30-11:00 am                      Coffee break

11:00 am-12:00 pm    Gianfrancesco Lusini (University of Naples): “Monasticism in Medieval Ethiopia: Holy Men, Scribes and Scholars”

12:00-1:15 pm                        Lunch break

1:15-2:15 pm              Samantha Kelly (Rutgers University): “The Ethiopians of Renaissance Europe”

2:15-3:15 pm              Habtamu Tegegne (Rutgers University): “Ethiopia’s Culture of Forgery, Problem of Document Deletion and Strategies of Preservation”

3:15-3:45 pm              Coffee break

3:45-4:45 pm              Roundtable: “Teaching Ge’ez”

4:45-5:45 pm              Roundtable: “The Literature of Ethiopia, Medieval and Modern”

5:45-6:00 pm              Closing remarks

6:00-7:00 pm              Reception

 

Sponsored by:

The Centre for Medieval Studies

The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations

The University of Saint Michael’s College

 

With generous support from:

The Italian Cultural Institute / Istituto Italiano di Cultura

 

Georges Whalen, requiescas in pace

We are very sad to share the news that Georges Whalen has passed away. Many of you may have known Georges during his years as an MA and doctoral student at the Centre for Medieval Studies (1983 – 1991), or perhaps encountered him at one of his favourite places to spend time, the Common Room of the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. More information on Georges’ life, including details about the family’s wishes concerning ways that Georges might be remembered, can be found here:

http://www.hpmcgarry.ca/book-of-memories/2832873/Whalen-Joseph-Kevin-Georges/obituary.php

Georges Whalen (right) in Rievaulx with Robert Stanton

Georges Whalen (right) in Rievaulx with Robert Stanton

Georges aurait été sensible au fait que notre message d’adieu soit écrit en anglais et en français.

Georges, merci pour ta joie, ta générosité, et surtout ton incroyable curiosité et ta gentillesse. Te connaître fut un plaisir et tes enfants peuvent compter sur de nombreux médiévistes à travers le monde pour leur conter des anecdotes, multiples et variées, sur toi et l’amitié qu’ils t’ont portée.

Charles Burnett, Arabica Veritas, February 10, 2017

2016-2017 W. John Bennett Distinguished Visiting Scholar

PROFESSOR CHARLES BURNETT (Warburg Institute, University of London)

Arabica Veritas. Europeans’ Search for ‘Truth’ in Arabic Scientific and Philosophical Literature of the Middle Ages

 

Friday, 10 February 2017, 4:10 pm;
Alumni Hall, Room 100 (121 St. Joseph Street);
Reception to follow

 

British Library, Royal 12.B.VI, f. 1r

British Library, Royal 12.B.VI, f. 1r

Why did the Latin world seek out Arabic texts for translation between the eleventh and the thirteenth centuries? In the religious context it is clear that Muslim literature was translated in order to understand and refute Islam. But in science and philosophy the search was for ‘the truth’ which could be found amongst the Arabs. This lecture explores what was meant by the ‘Arabica veritas’ (or ‘Arabum veritas’), and why this truth was regarded as being important. Can someone else’s ‘truth’ provide security in the face of the inherent uncertainty of sublunary matters?

 

Charles Burnett, MA, PhD, LGSM is Professor of the History of Arabic/Islamic Influences in Europe at the Warburg Institute, University of London, and Co-Director of the Centre for the History of Arabic Studies in Europe. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, Corresponding Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America, and Fellow of the International Society for the History of Science. He is leader of the Humanities in the European Research Area project on Encounters with the Orient in Early Modern European Scholarship (EOS). His research centres on the transmission of texts, techniques and artefacts from the Arab world to the West, especially in the Middle Ages. He has documented this transmission by editing and translating several texts that were first translated from Arabic into Latin, and also by describing the historical and cultural context of these translations. Throughout his research and his publications he has aimed to document the extent to which Arabic authorities and texts translated from Arabic have shaped European learning, in the universities, in medical schools and in esoteric circles. Among his books are The Introduction of Arabic Learning into England (1997), Arabic into Latin in the Middle Ages: The Translators and their Intellectual and Social Context (2009) and Numerals and Arithmetic in the Middle Ages (2010). Other interests include Jesuit education in Japan in the late sixteenth century, the use of Japanese themes in Latin drama in Europe in the seventeenth century and the use of music in therapy and in the Christian mission.