Updates regarding COVID-19

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Our administration office is closed and all the work is done remotely.  You can still leave messages on our main phone (416 978 4884) as our Graduate administrator can listen to them at distance. The best, however, is to reach us all via email or to reach the Interim Director (IC) on her cellphone.

The Summer Latin Program has started and all our Summer Latin courses are being given online. Please contact our graduate administrator for further details.

All our Fall courses will be given online and, for some of them, when possible, also in person. See the program here.

Training for TAships and Course Instructorships can be found on the TATP website.

PIMS Library and UofT Libraries are closedFor news about UofT Libraries, click here. “Curbside” pickup for faculty, students and staff is possible for books housed in Robarts that are not available through the HathiTrust Emergency Temporary Access Service (ETAS). You can make a request using a Get Help button in the catalogue record for a book you would like. If your request is successful, you will be notified by email and can pick the book up at Robarts. The Kelly Library is offering a similar Curbside Pickup Service. When you find an item owned by the Kelly Library and listed in the UofT Library Catalogue, click on the blue “Get Help” button in the lower right corner.  If the item is not available digitally through the HathiTrust Digital Library, you will be able to make a request to borrow the print book or DVD from the Kelly Library. You can find more information on Kelly Curbside Pickup here.

Moreover, for our CMS students: CMS and PIMS collaborate to provide digital access to some of the PIMS resources. Find out more here.

Interlibrary loans will also try to help you for your research; do not hesitate to reach out to themMoreover, many publishing houses and journals made their publications in free access. Check their websites. See also, among other sites, the National Emergency Library and OpenAccess.

Given that there exists far more resources online than the UTCat lets us see, if you need any assistance or have questions, a great person to contact is the liaison librarian for your discipline: https://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/liaison-librarians. No-one is specifically in charge of medieval studies but Graham Bradshaw would be happy to help. If he cannot help you himself, he will find another librarian whom to contact. Dr Greti Dinkova-Bruun (PIMS library) and Richard Carter (Kelly Library) would also be happy to be of help.

PhD defences, Special Field Exams, and Annual Committee meetings

For the time being, all will be done online, and not in-person. Students are responsible for organizing the SFE and their annual committee meetings. Contact the graduate administrator if you have any question.

September Latin exams: regarding their format, please read the attached memo. Concerning the practice exams and the mock exams in preparation for the September Latin exams, please refer to this second memo.

Possible sources of financial help for CMS students

There exists various emergency funds on campus and outside campus for Graduate students:

  1. FAS Graduate Students Emergency Bursary. This Bursary is now  managed via CMS. Fill up this form and send it to Rhonda Marley. The forms will be reviewed on Friday and the results being made known the following Monday.
  2. School of Graduate Studies’ Emergency Grant
  3. School of Graduate Studies’ Emergency Loan programs
  4. Canadian Government: for help from the Government that might be useful to Graduate Students, see this site. Careful: this document is regularly updated. So if its date seems a bit old, go on the website of the FAS Graduate Students Emergency Bursary to check if you can find a more recent version.

Moreover:

. The Student Executive Committee has also created a fund: the Student Executive Committee COVID-19 Relief Fund offers limited funds from the SEC budget to all CMS students (particularly MAs, P5 and unfunded PhDs, international students, and student parents) to help defray emergency expenses, lost income, rent, food, medication, and other costs incurred or exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Requests can be for as little as 20$. Please email any member of the student executive committee to apply or for more information.

AND

. CMS Executive Office has created a CMS Emergency Fund for PhD students outside of the funded cohort, to help them with the current situationOnly an annual meeting report (with the statement that you are in a “Satisfactory Standing”) and a rationale are required to apply. There is no deadline. Evaluations and payments are done weekly.

Moreover, there exists, at least for this year, CMS awards to support writing and completion for students who will be in P6-P8 this coming September. These awards amount to $4,000 (with one instalment of $2,000 in the Fall and the other one in the Spring). The deadline to apply was June 15.

Finally, whatever group you are in, do not hesitate to contact us.

SSHRC news: here

If you feel distressed in these difficult times, please go to this website: https://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/news/caring-your-mental-health.

In addition to the regular University Student Crisis Number (only during office hours: 416-946-7111), OISE has compiled a list of city resources especially for COVID-19 coping, with 24/7 emergency counselling services (the Gerstein crisis centre has been especially recommended): https://www.oise.utoronto.ca/aphd/Home/COVID-19_Coping_Resources/index.html

See as well, for graduate students, the Guide to Working From Home for Graduate/Postdoctoral Researchers and, for their supervisors, the Strategies for Graduate Mentoring and Supervision at a Distance.

See for University’s Employee and Family Assistance Program:  http://benefits.hrandequity.utoronto.ca/efap/

Each step to take in case you are worried regarding COVID-19 (see Self-Assessment by Ontario Public Health)

All employees and students should monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms listed in the University’s COVID-19 FAQs

  • If experiencing symptoms, please follow the directives detailed on the Toronto Public Health website including self-isolating, taking the available Self-Assessment and following the recommendations for seeking additional care from their primary care provider, Telehealth or nearest hospital based of their symptoms
  • If one of you (Faculty, student or staff member) is contacted by a Public Health authority with regards to COVID-19, please contact the University’s Occupational Health Nurse at: ehs.occhealth@utoronto.ca
  • If any student is sick or self-isolating, please advise your supervisor or the Interim Director and Acting Manager.
  • If any Faculty member or staff is sick or self-isolating, please contact Interim Director with Suzanne and Michael and complete the Employee Absence Self-Declaration form, available in the HR Service Centre and linked below:
  • If advised by Public Health that you are to self-isolate, you must confirm with Public Health that you are clear to resume normal activities prior to returning to work or study.

If you think someone you know might have it

“Remember that privacy is important: If you or someone else in your unit believes or suspects that a member of your unit may have been infected with COVID-19, we are not to share this information with others unless asked to do so by a Public Health Authority.”

Papers to be filled up for faculty who feels flu-like symptoms or is in self isolation

“In order to track COVID-19 related absences as advised by public health, we request that all faculty, staff and librarians who are absent due to flu-like symptoms or are self-isolating complete the Employee Absence Self-Declaration form, available in the HR Service Centre and linked below:

Travels

See Website https://safetyabroad.utoronto.ca/covid-19/

What if research-related travel needs to be reimbursed?

The tri-council is allowing reimbursement of canceled travel fees. See the website of Research Services https://research.utoronto.ca/covid-19 regarding Faculty. For students, please contact us, cc-ing at least two persons: graduate administrator, Interim Director, etc.

Here is the website with news from the University and FAQ. For SGS, check School of Graduate Studies information and for HR, HR & Equity COVID-19 page.

Please also refer to Government of Canada travel advisories and Toronto Public Health advisories as this is an evolving situation.

Careful all as there is an increase in internet scams, please read this message.

Rules and Regulations for the Reopening of the PIMS Library

Phone: 416-926-7146 (entire day) and 416-926-2094 (only in the afternoon)

Dr. Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Librarian

After serious deliberations and multiple discussions, the PIMS Library has received approval from the administration of St. Michael’s College to reopen on Monday, September 28, 2020. Until further notice, the Library will be open on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, 10 a.m. – 4.30 p.m.

Since the safety of the staff and readers is our highest concern, a series of rules and safety protocols have been implemented in accordance to provincial and national health guidelines. In general, the Library will operate at a reduced capacity, with readers NOT allowed to seat in the area of the main stacks (the only exception are the users of the microfilm reader/scanner). Readers with be allowed to study at the tables in the Reference Area, Paleography Room, and the middle Study/Board Room.

In accordance with the rules of social distancing, only 16 (sixteen) readers can be allowed in the Library at any given time. All readers must wear face masks during their entire visit; they also need to sanitize their hands frequently (sanitizing liquid will be provided), especially before touching any of the lockers, the public computers, the photocopier, and the handles of the movable shelves for periodicals.

What you need to do before coming to the PIMS Library?

1) If you are not coming to the library at 10 a.m., when we open and are likely to have study spaces available, it is advisable to call first to make sure that there is a place for you when you arrive. Admittance is provided on first come, first serve basis. No reservations will be taken.

2) When you reach the Kelly Library, you have to call us at the numbers provided above. One of the PIMS staff will come down to take you to the 4th floor, using either the elevator or the stairwells, according to preference. You CANNOT reach the 4th floor on your own; there will be a designated area on the first floor of the Kelly Library where you have to wait until one of us come down to fetch you.

3) You must have with you your old PIMS card. New cards will be issued for 2020-2021 at each reader’s first visit. If you have lost your old card, you will be allowed to enter upon approval.

4) Bring your own writing tools and prepare your visit by finding your references beforehand, if you are not bringing your computer with you. Two of the public computers in the reference area will be operational, but it is safer to avoid using them, if possible.

What you need to do in the PIMS Library?

1) Leave your belongings in the lockers. Do this AFTER you sanitize your hands.

2) Only water can be taken into the Library.

3) Enter the Library following the arrows.

4) Fill in the registration form (only at first visit) and sign the ledger at every visit. Please PRINT CLEARLY your name and the time of your entry and exit, so that we can implement tracking if necessary. The student monitor will assist the readers in this process.

5) Every reader will have their own box in which they MUST place all the books or microfilms they touch. Re-shelving of books is NOT allowed. This will be your box for the week. All books will be re-shelved at the end of the week, and microfilms will be returned to their place.

6) You will be shown to a place where you can work. You are NOT allowed to change seats.

7) You can go to the stacks to fetch your books. You MUST follow the arrows which ensure that there is only a one-way traffic. Please do not enter the areas that are closed off for readers.

7) If you need to exit the library for lunch (ca. 1 hour), you need to follow the exit procedures, and return using the entry procedures. Your place will be kept for you. NO FOOD can be eaten IN THE BUILDING during the pandemic. If you have your own lunch, you need to eat it outside.

What you need to do when you have to leave the PIMS Library?

1) Gather all the books you have used and touched in your box.

2) Leave a note with your name and phone number on top of the books.

3) Wipe your seat and working area. Wipes will be provided by the Library.

4) Take your box to the designated areas. The PIMS staff will show it to you. Your books will be kept in your box for the 3 (three) working days of the library. ALL BOOKS in boxes will be re-shelved every Monday morning, after a 4-day quarantine.

5) Exit through the “Exit” door, gather your belongings from the locker, and wipe the locker and the key. Wipes will be provided.

6) Inform the PIMS staff that you are ready to leave. You will be taken down by one of us; you CANNOT LEAVE on your own.

Award Announcement: SSHRC Insight Grant: Dorothea Kullmann

Congratulations to Prof. Dorothea Kullmann, who has been awarded a SSHRC Insight Grant!

Prof. Kullmann’s project was awarded for the period 2020-2023 and centres on medieval French Books of Hours. A brief description in English and French appears below.

Livres d’heures: textes et langue

English

The extraordinary success of the Book of Hours at the end of the European Middle Ages is well known. Designed for lay devotion, this type of book became a true « bestseller » of medieval times. Between the 14th and 16th centuries, it was produced in such numbers that we still have several thousand copies left—an enormous figure for a medieval book. Northern France was a particularly important centre for the production of Books of Hours. Most are written entirely in Latin, and only a few are entirely in French. However, many contain at least a few French prayers, often included in personalized “appendices” at the end of the books, or added at a later moment. Given the large number of Books of Hours produced in northern France, even the few prayers in French that these books contain form, when taken together, an extraordinary body of French text material, a coherent corpus that has never been studied from a linguistic perspective. Situated at an intermediate level between literature and texts of common use, prayers represent a middle register of the language the documentation of which is scarce. What is more, this corpus covers precisely the period of transition between old French and modern French, i.e. the period of “Middle French” and “16th-century French,” a period during which the language underwent profound changes which affected its very structure.

This project proposes to analyze Middle French with a new method, by analyzing the variants of the same texts in a large number of witnesses copied over an extended time span. To do this, we will create a database containing transcriptions of these texts. In addition, we will establish the catalogue of the Books of Hours kept in Canada outside Quebec, which have never been catalogued, in order to promote a little-known heritage (this work has already been started with the collaboration of CMS doctoral students). We will also edit unedited texts. Combining linguistics and philology, our approach will allow us, in particular, to go beyond the mere observation of the appearance of new forms and structures in literary texts, to follow the evolution of the average language and to better understand when and how comprehension of the old language was lost.

For more information, or if you are interested in collaborating on this project, please contact Prof. Dorothea Kullmann (dorothea.kullmann@utoronto.ca).

French

L’extraordinaire essor du livre d’heures à la fin du Moyen Âge européen est bien connu. Véritable « bestseller » de l’époque médiévale, ce type de livre conçu pour la dévotion des laïcs a été produit, entre le XIVe et le XVIe siècle, en des nombres tels qu’il nous en reste toujours plusieurs milliers d’exemplaires, chiffre énorme pour un livre médiéval. La France du Nord a été un centre particulièrement important de la production de livres d’heures. La plupart de ceux-ci sont rédigés entièrement en latin et rares sont ceux qui sont entièrement écrits en français. Cependant, un très grand nombre contient quelques prières françaises, souvent incluses dans des « annexes » plus personnelles en fin de volume, ou bien ajoutées après coup. Vu le grand nombre de livres d’heures produits en France du Nord, même les quelques prières en français que ces livres contiennent forment ensemble un extraordinaire corpus de matériau textuel de la langue française, corpus qui n’a jamais été étudié dans une optique linguistique. Participant à la fois du texte littéraire et du texte d’usage commun, les prières représentent un registre moyen de la langue qu’il est difficile de capter ailleurs. Qui plus est, ce corpus couvre justement la période de transition entre l’ancien français et le français moderne, donc la période du « moyen français » et du « français du XVIe siècle », période pendant laquelle la langue subit des changements profonds, qui affectent sa structure même.

Ce projet se propose d’analyser le moyen français par le biais d’une nouvelle méthode, l’analyse des variantes des témoins d’un même texte, dans la longue durée. Pour ce faire, on créera une base de données contenant des transcriptions de ces textes. En outre, on fera le catalogue des livres d’heures conservés au Canada hors Québec, qui n’ont jamais été répertoriés, afin de valoriser un patrimoine peu connu (ce travail a déjà été commencé avec la collaboration de doctorants du CMS). On éditera également des textes inédits. Combinant linguistique et philologie, notre approche nous permettra notamment d’aller au-delà du simple constat de l’apparition de nouvelles formes et structures dans des textes littéraires, de suivre l’évolution de la langue moyenne et de mieux comprendre quand et comment se perd la compréhension de l’ancienne langue.

Pour plus d’information, ou si vous intéressé à collaborer à ce projet, veuillez contacter Prof. Dorothea Kullmann (dorothea.kullmann@utoronto.ca).

Award Announcement: SSHRC Insight Grant: Practices of Commentary (2020-2025)

Congratulations to our faculty and students in the “Practices of Commentary” project, which has now won a SSHRC Insight Grant!

From the award announcement:

We are proud to announce a new five-year SSHRC Insight Grant project on the topic of “Practices of Commentary” centred at the University of Toronto (2020–2025).

Our primary goal is to set new research agendas for the longue durée of an interpretive mode that has been used in a diversity of cultures, has never ceased to shape opinions and worldviews, and continues to serve as a prime site for the perpetuation and innovation––and, sometimes, willful distortion––of knowledge, as seen in social media-infused digital spaces. The project seeks to develop a global perspective on practices of commentary, de-siloing regionally focused work while simultaneously offering fine-grained and nuanced accounts of the function of commentary in cultures and communities of the premodern world. This project thus has a global scope, bringing together both senior and junior scholars with expertise in various European, Near Eastern, and South and East Asian traditions to debate the theory and practice of commenting and commentary in humanistic studies today.

This project grew out of a Reading Group hosted at the Jackman Humanities Institute, begun in 2017. Led by Professors Walid Saleh (Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations), Amanda Goodman (Study of Religion, East Asian Studies), Jeannie Miller (Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations), and Markus Stock (Germanic Languages and Literatures), and with the active participation and support of our colleague Suzanne Akbari (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton), the project unites participants from many further humanities departments at the University of Toronto, including Classics, English, Philosophy, and the Centre for Medieval Studies. It also brings together world-leading scholars from Carleton University, McMaster University, the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, the Goethe University Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Needham Research Institute, and the National University of Singapore.

We hope that this grant’s collaborations, and in particular the students and other early career scholars who will participate in it, will bring about a transformation and develop a deep comparative background to our individual disciplines.

Stay tuned for further announcements, including our plans for a virtual launch for all interested colleagues. For further information, or to get involved, please contact PI Dr. Walid Saleh (walid.saleh@utoronto.ca), or Dr. Jessica Lockhart (jessica.lockhart@utoronto.ca).

Final Instructions Regarding the CMS Latin Exams in September 2020

Dear Students,

     By now everybody who intends to write the CMS Latin exams in September should have registered with Rhonda Marley, specifying whether they are writing Level One, Level Two, or both. Everybody should have also indicated if they would be interested in writing the exam in person. If you have not registered yet, you are strongly encouraged to do it immediately. If you are not a U of T student, please contact Rhonda Marley (gradadm.medieval@utoronto.ca) to  obtain a Guest ID.

Level One exam will take place on September 9, 1-4 p.m. Eastern/Toronto time.
Level Two exam will take place on September 11, 1-4 p.m. Eastern/Toronto time.

 1. Writing the Latin Exams online

     The default option for writing the September exams is doing so online. Exams will be conducted through a designated Quercus site (accessible with students’ credentials for registered U of T students and via temporary guest access for students who have not yet registered and for external participants). Live support and monitoring will be offered to the participants in the exams by members of the Latin Committee through a video-meeting on Zoom. The exams will be posted on the Quercus page as pdf files, and the phone number of one of the monitoring Committee members will be provided for contact in case of emergency. The students will NOT be recorded while taking the exams.

     For the students who choose this option, there are two ways of writing the exam:

1) Writing the exam completely on Quercus using the marking tools provided by the system. The Latin Committee encourages all students to train themselves using the system through the practice and mock exams available at https://q.utoronto.ca/courses/173888. If students have problems accessing this page, they should contact Cillian O’Hogan (cillian.ohogan@utoronto.ca)

2) Students who wish to print the exam, can do so after downloading the pdf file from the Quercus page at the beginning of the exam; then they will need to type their translations in Quercus. If a student who wishes to take this option, anticipates technical problems, please contact Greti Dinkova-Bruun (greti.dinkova.bruun@utoronto.ca).

NOTA BENE! In both options the students have to enter Quercus and stay in Quercus. Students are not allowed to open any other application but Quercus on their computer monitors. This means that students cannot cut and paste the exam in Word and work on their translation in a Word file on their computer desktops.

For additional information about Quercus, please consult this page. For additional information about Zoom, please consult this page.

 2. Writing the Latin Exams on-site in person

     The option of writing the exams on-site in person will be available to all students who wish to choose it. The venue will be the main building of the Pontifical Institute for Mediaeval Studies, i.e. the Institute’s classroom A and the Common Room. Safety protocols have been implemented to ensure social distancing and avoid health hazards. Masks will have to be worn, as per the university guidelines.

     All students, who are choosing this option, need to contact Greti Dinkova-Bruun (greti.dinkova.bruun@utoronto.ca) who will be organizing and monitoring the in person writing of the exams.

     The Latin Committee also reminds the students that any students with specific accessibility needs or health concerns can express their preference for writing the exams in person at the University of Toronto Exam Centre. The Exam Centre will do its best to satisfy such requests. For additional information about the University of Toronto Accessibility Services, please consult this page.

     Finally, any change in preferences should be communicated to Rhonda Marley by 2 September 2020.

For the Latin Committee

Dr. Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Chair
greti.dinkova.bruun@utoronto.ca

One Click to Fisher’s Medieval Manuscripts

Fisher Manuscript Categories

You can now use a single link to access all of the Fisher Rare Book Library’s online medieval manuscripts.

Fisher has also added “medieval manuscripts” as a separate category on their digital collections page, to enhance ease of access.

Please note that the Fisher digital collections as a whole are being overhauled, so the links above may change in the future. Please check their web page for updates.

Congratulations to Talia Zajac (CMS 2017) for her two postdoc fellowships

 Talia Zajac has been offered and has accepted the following prestigious postdoctoral fellowships: a Mellon Fellowship at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies for the coming academic year 2020-2021 and a 36-month Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship beginning May 2021 in the John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester. She will conduct research on “Royal women, cultural exchanges, and Rus’ ecumenical marriages, circa 1000-1250”

Seal by the Rus’–born Duchess Gremislava (or in Polish, Grzymisława, d. 1258), widow of Duke Leszek the White of Kraków (d. 1227), affixed to a charter issued on 12 May 1228, kept in the Archiwum Główne Akt Dawnych / The Central Archives of Historical Records in Warsaw, Zb. dok. perg. 6429, digitized at: http://www.agad.gov.pl/inwentarze/ddpp.xml

Regarding this seal, Talia wrote “To the best of my knowledge, this is the only extant seal issued by a Rus’-born bride in Latin Christendom in the pre-Mongol period (before 1240/1241). It is also remarkable because it is the earliest Polish seal that depicts a duchess crowned, seated on a throne, and alone, without written or visual reference to the authority of husbands or sons; a strong statement of female authority.”

Congratulations to Elisa Brilli for a recent co-edited publication with Johannes Bartuschat and Delphine Carron

Florence, the celebrated city-republic, dominates the historiography of medieval Italy still today. The birth and growth of the Mendicant Orders paralleled the rise of urban Europe. As attention to medieval cities has increased, so too the history of the Dominican Order has constituted a major field of study, since the Dominicans were at the forefront of the cultural and religious life of Medieval cities. The combination of these two traditions of studies precipitates a particularly fruitful research field: the reciprocal influences and interactions between the activities of Dominican intellectuals and the making of Florentine cultural identity. The essays collected in this volume explore various facets of such an interaction. Without presuming to be exhaustive, these contributions restore the complexity of the relationship between the Dominicans and the city of Florence, as well as the communal society in the broadest sense of the term.

J. Bartuschat, E. Brilli, D. Carron (eds.), The Dominicans and the Making of Florentine Cultural Identity (13th-14th centuries), Florence: FUP, 2020 (Reti Medievali Ebook, 36). Open access: https://www.fupress.com/isbn/9788855180467 

Contents: 

Emilio Panella OP, Ouverture: Santa Maria Novella e Firenze: convento e città
Johannes Bartuschat, Elisa Brilli, Delphine Carron, Introduction
Delphine Carron, Iñigo Atucha, Anna Pegoretti, Chronologie de Santa Maria Novella (1291-1319)
Delphine Carron, Influences et interactions entre Santa Maria Novella et la commune de Florence. Une étude de cas: les sermons de Remigio de’ Girolami (1295-1301)
Ruedi Imbach, Une métaphysique thomiste florentine. Notule sur le traité De modis rerum de Remigio de’ Girolami
Blaise Dufal, Nicholas Trevet : le théologien anglais qui parlait à l’oreille des Italiens
Anna Pegoretti, Lo “studium” e la biblioteca di Santa Maria Novella nel Duecento e nei primi anni del Trecento (con una postilla sul Boezio di Trevet)
Cecilia Iannella, Giordano da Pisa e il pubblico. Modelli e comportamenti
Maria Conte, Gli “Ammaestramenti degli Antichi”di Bartolomeo da San Concordio. Prime osservazioni in vista dell’edizione critica
Roberto Lambertini, L’usura tra Santa Croce e Santa Maria Novella: Pietro de Trabibus e Remigio de’ Girolami a confronto
Andrea Tabarroni, Disciplinamento sociale e teologia nei Quodlibeta di Pietro de Trabibus
Sonia Gentili, Poesia e filosofia a Firenze tra Santa Croce e Santa Maria Novella
Thomas Ricklin, L’ordre dominicain dans le ciel du soleil. Dante Alighieri et la « viva giustizia » du Paradiso
Francesco Bruni, Dante, Remigio de’ Girolami, il sistema angioino: teologia e politica

Memo Regarding the CMS Practice and Mock Latin Exams, Summer 2020

Dear Students,

     As promised in the previous memo regarding our options for administering the Centre’s Latin exams in September, we are now providing the information on the practice and mock exams which all students are welcome and encouraged to participate in. Both the practice and mock exams will be offered through U of T’s Quercus platform, accessible with students’ credentials for registered U of T students and via temporary guest access for students who have not yet registered and for external participants. To obtain a Guest ID, please contact Rhonda Marley (gradadm.medieval@utoronto.ca).

     All incoming and current students who have not yet passed both exams will be added to the course by June 23, along with non-CMS students currently enrolled in summer Latin courses. Other non-CMS students should contact Rhonda Marley to be enrolled, as should any current or incoming students who have not been added by June 23.

     1. Practice Exams

     A new course called “CMS Latin Exams” has been created on Quercus: (https://q.utoronto.ca/courses/173888).The purpose of this practice exams is to give an opportunity to the students to test and familiarize themselves with the technical aspects of writing the exam on Quercus.

     2. Mock Exams

     The mock exams will be set for Monday, July 20, 1 p.m. Eastern/Toronto time. Students who plan to write the mock exam/s need to register by July 15.

     The mock exams will contain 2 passages instead of 4 and would thus be scheduled for 1,5 hours rather than 3, as is the case for the real exams. The mock exams will be timed but not marked, although translations for self-check will be provided. The mock exams will be monitored by a member of the Latin Committee through a video-meeting on Zoom. The purpose of the mock exams is for the students to have an experience as close as possible to the real exam situation in September, and to get acquainted with the hybrid Quercus/Zoom system adopted by CMS for the September exams.

     3. Feedback from the Students

     CMS and the Latin Committee will appreciate the students’ feedback by July 31, so that any potential technical problems could be addressed in timely fashion. Please send your comments to the Chair of the CMS Student Executive Committee Laura Moncion (laura.moncion@mail.utoronto.ca).

For the Latin Committee

Dr. Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Chair
greti.dinkova.bruun@utoronto.ca

Posted in Uncategorized

Memo Regarding the CMS Practice and Mock Latin Exams, Summer 2020

Dear Students,

     As promised in the previous memo regarding our options for administering the Centre’s Latin exams in September, we are now providing the information on the practice and mock exams which all students are welcome and encouraged to participate in. Both the practice and mock exams will be offered through U of T’s Quercus platform, accessible with students’ credentials for registered U of T students and via temporary guest access for students who have not yet registered and for external participants. To obtain a Guest ID, please contact Rhonda Marley.

     All incoming and current students who have not yet passed both exams will be added to the course by June 23, along with non-CMS students currently enrolled in summer Latin courses. Other non-CMS students should contact Rhonda Marley to be enrolled, as should any current or incoming students who have not been added by June 23.

     1. Practice Exams

     A new course called “CMS Latin Exams” has been created on Quercus. The purpose of these practice exams is to give an opportunity to the students to test and familiarize themselves with the technical aspects of writing the exam on Quercus.

     2. Mock Exams

     The mock exams will be set for Monday, July 20, 1 p.m. Eastern/Toronto time. Students who plan to write the mock exam/s need to register by July 15 by contacting Rhonda Marley.

     The mock exams will contain 2 passages instead of 4 and would thus be scheduled for 1,5 hours rather than 3, as is the case for the real exams. The mock exams will be timed but not marked, although translations for self-check will be provided. The mock exams will be monitored by a member of the Latin Committee through a video-meeting on Zoom. The purpose of the mock exams is for the students to have an experience as close as possible to the real exam situation in September, and to get acquainted with the hybrid Quercus/Zoom system adopted by CMS for the September exams.

     3. Feedback from the Students

     CMS and the Latin Committee will appreciate the students’ feedback by July 31, so that any potential technical problems could be addressed in timely fashion. Please send your comments to the Chair of the CMS Student Executive Committee Laura Moncion.

For the Latin Committee
Dr. Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Chair.

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